SNC-ECCE-Key Learning areas

    1. INTRODUCTION TO THE KEY LEARNING AREAS AND COMPETENCIES

The key learning areas outlined in this curriculum contains competencies, or goals which have been outlined for children at the pre-primary stages of education. These six areas of learning provide a foundation for later learning  and  achievement.  It  is  important  to remember that children progress at  different  rates,  that  individual  achievement  will  vary and that ECCE teachers must appreciate and recognise the language and culture of the children.

Children whose achievements exceed the expected outcomes should be provided with opportunities which extend their knowledge and skills. There may be others who will require continuous support to achieve all or some of outcomes at entering Grade I. Care must be taken to ensure that they get the opportunities of revision and reinforcement. Children with special educational needs may also need varied kinds  of  support throughout schooling.

This curriculum for the early years has been divided into the following key learning areas. Each key learning area has been assigned between three to ten competences of learning goals.

      1. Personal Social and Emotional Development

 

These outcomes focus on children’ learning how to work, play, co-operate with others and function in groups beyond the family. They cover important aspects of personal, social, moral and spiritual development and of personal values agreed upon by the adults in the community, including the parents.

      1. Language and Literacy

 

These outcomes cover important aspects of language development and provide the foundation for literacy. At the start, the language used in the programmes for all six areas of development, could be in mother tongue, based on local culture and it can then gradually and progressively be further developed to acquire competence in English. Children should be helped gradually to acquire competence in Urdu, making use where appropriate, for developing understanding and skills in languages. The outcomes focus on children’s developing competence in talking and listening and becoming readers and writers. It is important to note that the other areas of learning make a vital contribution to the successful development of communication and literacy.

      1. Basic Mathematical Concepts

 

These outcomes cover important aspects of understanding mathematics and provide the foundation for numeracy. They focus on achievement and application through practical activities and on using and understanding mathematical language.

 

      1. The World Around Us

 

These outcomes focus on development of children’s knowledge and understanding of their environment, other people and features of the natural and “human” world. They provide a foundation for historical, geographical, scientific and technological learning.

      1. Physical Development

 

These outcomes focus on children’s development, physical control, mobility, awareness of space and manipulation skills in indoor and outdoor environment. The Children will demonstrate balance and coordination, to learn and practice motor skills.

      1. Health, Hygiene and Safety

 

These outcomes focus  on  developing  understanding  of  personal  care,  environmental safety and security in children. These include establishing positive  attitudes  towards  a healthy and active way of life.

      1. Creative Arts

 

These outcomes focus on the development of children’s imagination and their ability to communicate and to express ideas, feelings, and observations and experiences in creative ways. They include encouraging children to think about new and innovative ideas which can be expressed through varied media.

    1. COMPETENCIES AND EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Children learn at their own individual pace according to their interest and learning styles. At the young age of 4-5 years children should not be forced to learn beyond their capacity because this will impede their learning and cognitive development.

The ECCE Curriculum charts out learning outcomes that young children are expected to attain. However, given the diverse learning styles and paces, many children may not achieve all the outcomes in one year of the pre- primary grade. Therefore, the outcomes for the subject pre-primary grade are termed “Expected” and educators and supervisors should not be overly concerned about children completing activities or meeting each and every outcome. It is the process and not the production of the learning that is more important at this stage!

For all the key Learning Areas, and Competencies there is a list of Expected Learning Outcomes, which start with, “By the end of the year, children will begin to …”It is important to reiterate that in the early years, children learn and achieve the expected outcomes by the end of the year. This is why the outcomes in the National ECCE Curriculum are called expected learning outcomes  and  not  student  learning  outcomes,  as  are  in  the  curricula for Grade 1-12. As long  as  the  teacher  is  providing  continuous  and  varied  opportunities for hands-on learning and children are engaged enthusiastically, teacher supervisor and parents should not be overly concerned.

    1. EXAMPLES AND IDEAS FOR IMPLEMENTATION

An additional column containing examples and ideas for implementation has been added, to this curriculum to provide some implementation suggestions, for teachers writers of Teachers’ Guide and for those who will develop teaching-learning resources for this age group.

 

As the term suggests, these are examples and ideas only, and are not intended as a prescriptive or exhaustive list of activities for teachers to follow.

It is hoped that teachers will use these suggestions as a starting point, and localize the ideas to meet the needs of the children’s context and make  cross-curricular  links  for enhanced learning. In case special needs child necessary adaptations will be made to meaningfully engage the child in learning.

    1. PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Competency 1: Children will develop an understanding of their likes, dislikes, strengths, emotions and self-grooming, decision making and problem solving skills. Children will further enhance their positive sense of self-identity and see themselves as capable learners.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Share what they like about themselves and what they like about a friend and others.
  2. Identify different occasions when they feel happy, sad, scared, loved, angry, excited and bored.
  3. Choose and talk about an activity/work that they enjoy doing the most in class
  4. Express their likes and dislikes and talk about their strengths and areas of

improvement.

  1. Develop and understand that as

individuals, they have their unique needs, interests and abilities and that they are different from each other.

  1. Develop and understand how to dress up, know about eating habits, proper posture while walking, talking and sitting.
  2. Take care of his/her and others’ belongings
  3. Perceive himself/herself in  a  positive way
  4. Ask for help when needed
  5. Develop problem solving skills by

identifying the problems and finding the best solutions through participating in different activities

This competency focuses on developing children’s               self-confidence             and understanding of their lifestyles and preferences.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Ask open ended questions, Why & how questions so that children can think

about their responses. For examples, if a child says I want to be a pilot, teachers should also ask her why she/he wants to become a pilot-what does she/he likes

about pilots?

  • Be patient with children so that they have

adequate thinking time and then

respond. They should never be rushed into answering.

  • Encourage children to keep learning areas tidy.
  • Encourage children to seek permission before taking others’ belongings. They should keep only those things in their bag which belong to them.
  • Putting lunch-boxes and  water-bottles at

the assigned place and remembering to take them back home.

  • Respond to significant experiences,

showing a range of feelings (happy, sad, worried, scared and angry) appropriate to situations; for example, birthday

celebration and “dua” (prayer) for

deceased family members of peers etc.

  • Appreciate and talk about the

characteristics that make each person special and unique (name, gender, eye colour).

 

Competency 2: Children will be willing to share and work in collaboration with their peers, teachers, family members and neighbours, regardless of any di?erences, such as, in gender, ability, culture, language and ethnicity.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Show an understanding and respect for the feelings of their peers and others.
  2. Cooperate with peers, teachers, family and community members.
  3. Work cooperatively and share materials and ideas amicably in groups.
  4. Form friendly and interactive relations with peers and adult around them.
  5. Learn to respect others’ opinion while communicating.
  6. Wait for your turn.
  7. Cooperate with and be sensitive to peers,

elders, and neighbours who may be differently abled.

  1. Work in collaboration, in groups/project work to promote leadership skills.

This competency focuses on developing children’s relationship with the people they interact with on a daily bases.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the

following ways:

  • Encourage children to help each other carrying out small tasks, like handling

and    using     class    materials      such as, books,

blocks and beads.

  • Help children to work and play amicably by assigning roles in groups and being respectful towards each other.
  • Help children make queues when going out of the class for outdoor activities,

during break, for washing hands and coming back to the classroom.

  • Help children take turns during

classroom discussion, be attentive and respectful when peers or teacher are

sharing their views and experiences.

  • Be available to support children resolve conflicts, using a problem-solving

approach.

 

Competency 3: Children will learn about and appreciate their heritage and culture and develop acceptance, respect and appreciation for the diversity of cultures and languages.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Talk about the cultural aspects of their l ives, such as, language, clothing,

lifestyle, food, traditions and customs.

  1. Talk about the key cultural practices to resolve      conflicts       and issues        and celebrate festivals
  2. Recognize historical and cultural places.
  3. Narrate stories heard from elders.
  4. Play local games (hide and seek, jumping, tug of war, clay modelling)
  5. Develop  basic  knowledge  about Pakistani culture. (i.e. know about the national game, flag, flower, food, folk dresses, languages etc.)

This competency focuses on developing children’s understanding of life, cultures and history. This competency aims to develop children’s appreciation of culture that is part of their daily lives.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Initiate     discussions     about     cultural

events which the children experience directly.

  • Talk about  their  cultural  practices  such as autaq, kacheri, Jirga, majlis, chopaal etc.
  • Talk about and celebrate religious and cultural festivals, i.e., Eid-ul-Fitr, Eid-ul-Azha, national events such as Independence                   Day  and Jashan-e-Baharaan, depending on the local culture.
  • Help them observe and identify the beautiful and unique patterns in old buildings and cultural places.

 

Competency 3: Children will learn about and appreciate their heritage and culture and develop acceptance, respect and appreciation for the diversity of cultures and languages.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

g. Respect the feelings and views of others irrespective of their religion, caste,

colour, creed and people with special needs.

  • Invite parents and grandparents to tell stories.
  • Encourage them to talk about and play their favourite local games by ensuring equal opportunities for all and taking

care of their individual needs

  • Talk about places for family gatherings in their local context
  • Celebrate culture and harmony days (cultural games, food, dresses etc.)

Competency 4: Children will develop an under?anding of their own religious values and practices as well as respect for others’ religious values and practices, with acceptance and appreciation for the di?erences that exist.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Recognise, appreciate and respect similarities and differences among people
  2. Associate and mingle with children

having  diverse   abilities   and backgrounds

  1. Know and understand that the state religion of Pakistan is Islam.
  2. Recognize that other religions exist in Pakistan as well
  3. Name their religion.
  4. Appreciate         “peace”        (love, care, friendship,

tolerance, kindness and respect for

others)     as   a    common     value across religions.

  1. Muslim children will:
    • Believe that Allah is the Sole

Creator and Prophet  Muhammad is His last and most beloved

Prophet.

    • Believe that Islam stands for peace and harmony.
    • Recite the first Kalma.
    • Recite small dua’as and know why they should be recited
  1. Non-Muslim children will learn and

practice about their own religion Respect other religions and have tolerance for other religions.

This competency focuses on developing children’s concept of religion and respect for all religious.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Assign tasks to mix-ability groups with

pre-defined rules (displayed in the classroom as classroom norms)

  • Promote the values of tolerance and respect for everyone. Young children should be made confident that Allah

loves them. He has created them with love and wants them to love their

fellow-beings. Notions of ‘fear; or

‘punishment’ should not be inculcated at this young age.

  • Recite small dua’as so that Muslim

children are introduced to the ethics of Islamic living. Help children understand the significance of dua’as. For example why we should recite dua’as before

eating or sleeping – what do they mean and how they communicate our

gratefulness to Allah?

  • Support children who belong to other religions to recite their own prayers and share their beliefs.

 

Competency 5: Children will demon?rate a sense of responsibility for self and others in

class, school, home and neighbourhood.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Manage small tasks leading to self-reliance.
  2. Take care of their own belongings and

put classroom materials back in the right place after use.

  1. Identify and implement small tasks l eading to a sense of responsibility for

school, community and public property.

  1. Recognise that water, food, electricity

and paper are very important resources and need to be used responsibly.

  1. Recognise and practice their responsibility in keeping the

environment, home, classroom and neighbourhood clean.

  1. Take care of peers in class, school and in family.

This competency focuses on developing children’s confidence and self-reliance, and on developing an understanding and appreciation for the responsible use of scarce resources.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Encourage a sense of care and

responsibility in children. For example,

turning pages of books with care; helping in setting the snacks carefully; returning materials to the designated place after use in school and at home.

  • Stand back and let them resolve little problems independently, until they ask

for help. Encourage them to help other children and adults in the classroom and neighbourhood.

  • Discuss respect for others’ property and give them responsibility for:
  • Performing tasks assigned individually and in groups
  • Cleaning up after snack time.
  • Using materials with care, keeping tables, shelves and walls clean.
  • Using waste bin for throwing litter and wrappers, after checking for ‘junk’ that can be recycled.
  • Taking pride in clean, environment.
  • Returning things that do not belong to

them, to an adult, switching off fans and lights when leaving room.

  • Group leader will bring materials for group work from the learning corners
  • Group leader helps others within the group to complete the task
  • Talk about the importance of  water, food, electricity and paper. Discuss in simple terms where they come  from; how we need these in our daily lives and how these can be depleted and ‘hurt’ the earth if we don’t use them carefully.

 

 

Competency 6: Children will use common courtesy expressions like greetings, please, welcome, thank you, sorry, excuse me.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Speak politely.
  2. Take turns when speaking and respect the right of others to speak
  3. Respect everyone
  4. Take initiative to greet others.
  5. Use courtesy words as per situation.
  6. Facial expression and body language should be in accordance with the greeting words.

This competency focuses on developing children’s courteous conversation and mannerism to help develop positive and healthy relationships with peers and elders.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • The teachers present  themselves  as  a role model in front of students by always practicing polite expression.
  • By providing reinforcement through role-plays and practice during the classroom activities.
  • By displaying some charts/pictorial displays reflecting common courtesy expressions.

 

Competency 7: Children will learn and develop a sense of citizenship.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Recognise the fact that rules are

important/required in the classroom, school, home and community.

  1. Understand why rules are necessary and how they help us
  2. Identify some basic traffic rules (traffic lights, zebra crossing, etc).
  3. Exhibit the understanding that

individuals have different opinions and learn the importance of listening to

others’ ideas and point of view patiently.

  1. Identify their responsibilities with respect to each right (go to school regularly and do homework, take care of the play equipment and environment)

This competency focuses on developing sense of citizenship

Teachers    can    facilitate     learning     in the following ways:

  • Encourage students to design classroom

rules and implement them within the classroom.

  • Storytelling and poems with the moral, why rules are important and discussing the consequences of not following the rules.
  • Help students to identify traffic lights and Zebra crossing through different

activities and make them understand how they work and help us.

  • By generating group discussions (Circle Time), students take turns to speak and listen to others patiently and attentively.
  • By giving students responsibility of small classroom tasks (collection of notebooks,

tidying up after each activity, taking care of their belongings)

  • Demonstrate                and   develop understanding of queuing up and  wait for their own turn at school and public places.

 

Competency 8: Children will develop and demon?rate ethical and moral values such as hone?y, inner accountability, social ju?ice, empathy, compassion and respect.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the term kindness and the importance of being kind to others
  2. Understand the importance of sharing and list the things they can share with others (toys).
  3. Understand that mistakes are a part of

learning and nothing to be ashamed of or to make fun of.

  1. Develop the ability to think about and

take personal accountability for actions.

  1. Develop and understanding of

truthfulness, honesty, fairness and trustworthiness in their actions.

This competency focuses demonstrate ethical and moral values.

Teachers    can    facilitate                   learning               in    the following ways:

  • Encourage     children      to share              their

real-life experiences on kindness.

  • Provide opportunities that encourage

sharing       within       and                   beyond    the classroom

  • Encourage children to share if anything goes wrong and make them comfortable that it’s okay to make mistakes.
  • Identify ways in which we can reduce the hurt caused to others (admit  mistake, ask for forgiveness, do something special for them, appreciation)
  • Share moral stories, role plays and

children’s own life experiences with the whole class

  • Develop the habit of self-reflection in students.
    1. LANGUAGE AND LITERACY

All the following competencies require that teachers start the language and Literacy

program in children’s Mother Tongue, based on local culture and gradually add Urdu and English (wherever applicable), and also reference from the wider culture. Children need

the confidence that their mother tongue is valued.

 

2.5.1 LISTENING AND SPEAKING SKILLS

Competency 1: Children will engage confidently with others using language in a variety of ways for a variety of purposes and contexts.

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Listen attentively in small and large

groups and share their  views  about every event and special occasions.

  1. Respond to others in a variety of verbal and non-verbal ways for a variety of purposes,         for example         exchanging ideas, expressing feelings, and a variety of contexts, plan-work-clean-up-review, group work time’.
  2. Talk about their experiences and feelings with peers and adults by using complete sentences.
  3. Respond to and verbally express a range of feelings, such as, joy and sorrow,

wonder and anger.

The primary function of Competency 1 is to enhance children’s confidence and ability to communicate with fluency.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Engage children in conversation by talking about special cultural and national events which  are  meaningful for them, encourage them at school as well as at home. Initiate the conversation by sharing own news, experience and feelings, taking care that these are appropriate for the children. Following the weekend, ask learning questions or comments such as, “I wonder if anyone went to the park yesterday ….; or “I can see that Ayesha has mehndi/henna on her hands;

 

 

2.5.1 LISTENING AND SPEAKING SKILLS

Competency 1: Children will engage confidently with others using language in a variety of ways for a variety of purposes and contexts.

  1. Show respect for a variety of ideas and beliefs by listening and responding

appropriately.

  1. Wait for their turn to speak and not interrupt when others are talking.
  2. Initiate conversations with peers and adults.
  3. Recognition of letters with their initial sounds.
  4. Recognition of phonemes (phonemic awareness) in spoken words.
  5. Know the sounds of vowels a-e-i-o-u.
  6. Recognition of digraphs
  7. Use rhyme and relate this is spelling pattern (word building).
  8. Recognise and differentiate between sounds in the environment.
  9. Understand and follow instructions.
  10. Use correct pronunciation.
  11. Recognition of phonemes (phonemic awareness) in spoken words.

Do you think someone in her family is getting married?;It looks like Ali has had a haircut.” Encourage children to give answers in complete sentences.

  • Introduce sounds using different mode of technology and techniques (smart

phone, cassette player, multi media

player) (tapping, drumming, local   no cost resources)

  • For example the word “mat” has three phonemes: /m/ /a/ /t/ (make the process of learning to read a lot easier and more fun when children come across new words, they can sound them out  using their phonemic abilities.
  • Encourage children to listen to different sounds in their environment for example, paper tearing, dropping and tapping things, animal voices, wind blowing, audio players and musical instruments.
  • Establish an environment where children feel free to talk, by placing self at children’s height level. Be available to converse with all the children throughout the day. Refer one child’s questions and problems to another
  • Listen actively to children and wait for

them to complete what they are saying. Be patient with their hesitation  and  at the same time help other children to listen and wait, by holding up a hand, and nodding, assuring them that  they will get a turn. Display appropriate facial expressions and body language to

communicate respect, joy, sorrow or wonder.

  • Play games where they have to understand and follow simple

instructions. For example, “Ayesha, touch your head and then your nose and then clap your hands.”

  • Teacher will use phonic rhymes and

sounds in audio/video  form.  Children will learn the rhyme and will identify letters with their initial sounds.

  • Repeat the correct pronunciation of words that children may have

mispronounced, without telling them that they were incorrect.

  • Help them enhance their vocabulary, by encouraging them to guess new words by playing games like ‘I spy with my little eye something that begins with the letter A, or B’. Action poems and songs are a goodway to learn words and sentences.

 

 

Competency 2: Children will describe objects, events and their plans for the day.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Name things in their environment.
  2. Describe and talk about pictures, drama, animated video etc
  3. Share their plans for the day and describe the previous or upcoming events and days
  4. Express their ideas with clarity.
  5. Extend their ideas or accounts by

providing some detail about their topic and daily routine

  1. Describe a picture by using appropriate words or simple sentences

This competency is designed to help children to process and comprehend spoken language and to communicate their thoughts, needs, interests and feelings to others.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Take children for a walk around the school and play a game of naming

objects that they see in the environment. Back in the classroom, encourage children to try  and  recall what they had seen in the environment.

  • Talk about and discuss pictures from children’s story books, or pictures

(age/culturally appropriate) that have been cut out from old magazines or newspapers.

  • Facilitate discussion about their daily routine
  • Sing songs and recite poems in a similar manner with action and encourage

children to do role play.

  • Play games where children have shut their eyes and ask them to listen to

different sounds in the environment and guess who or what is making those

sounds. For example, the  sound  of  a bird, a cat or dog, a rickshaw or a bus. At other times, make sound such as clapping, tapping or stomping your  foot and ask them to identify the sound.

  • Listen to the children as they work and play, and make up chants and rhythms along with them. Recite rhyming words, even if all of them don’t make sense and laugh at these together. Develop a playful interest in respective sounds and words, aspects of language such as rhythm, rhyme, alliteration, and an

enjoyment      of     exciting                       stories               and rhymes.

 

 

Competency 3: Children will enjoy listening to stories and poems/rhymes and make up their own stories and rhymes.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Retell and respond to stories, songs and rhymes by joining verbally or with actions as appropriate
  2. Recognise and differentiate between sounds in the environment
  3. Appreciate      the     concept      of words, rhymes and syllables.
  4. Make up their own stories and rhymes

This competency focuses on enjoying stories, poems and songs and on children making up their own stories and taking part in role play with confidence.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Tell children traditional stories and tales which have cultural relevance for them. Occasionally, use simple props such as puppets, masks and toys available in

local context.

  • Help children explore using language

through enjoyable ways like playing with words, rhymes, poems, stories and role play.

  • Sit with children on the floor, on a

mat/darri so that you are closer and at the same physical level as them.

  • Tell stories without props too, so that

children can build on their imagination.

  • Maintain their interest in stories and

poems by being animated and telling or reading a story with expression. Pause

for children’s comments or  questions and enjoy their responses. Make story telling a fun activity.

  • Sing songs and recite poems with actions and encourage children to role play.
  • Listen to the children as they work and play, and make up chants and rhymes

along with them. Recite rhyming words, even if all of them do not make sense and laugh at these together. Develop a playful interest in repetitive sounds and words, aspects of language such as

rhythm, rhymes, and alliteration and an enjoyment of stories and rhymes.

  • Practice syllable activities, for example, ‘clap and say’, ‘hip-po-pot-a-mus’

 

 

2.5.2 READING SKILLS

Competency 4: Children will enjoy age appropriate books and handle them carefully.

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Hold, open and turn pages of a  book with care.
  2. Enjoy skimming/scanning through age appropriate books.
  3. Predict the story by looking at the cover page and flipping through pages.
  4. Predict what comes next in stories.
  5. Ask open ended questions about the story to support critical and logical

thinking.

  1. Repeat simple repetitive sequences in

traditional        and      popular                        children’s stories.

  1. Tell a simple story by looking at pictures.
  2. Retell a favourite story in the correct sequence.

This competency focuses on pre-reading skills. Children will enjoy books and handle them carefully.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Hold up books for children when reading a story and show them the pictures. Show enjoyment and respect of books through actions and facial expressions. Share own feelings about books during circle time. Encourage the  children  to tell a story by looking at the pictures. If they make up their own stories, just accept them. However, if they are re-telling a favourite story,  and  they miss important steps in the sequence, help them to remember by questioning gently and appealing to their sense of reasoning.
  • Establish a reading corner in the

classroom. Encourage children to bring books        (used                books)    from                home (wherever possible) to keep them in the reading corner for a few days.

  • Show children how to hold and open a

book without spoiling or tearing it. Show them also how to turn the pages with

care. Learning to respect other people’s property is an important part of learning about right and wrong.

  • Build up a sense of anticipation and give children the opportunity to guess what will happen next in a story. Also wait for and encourage them to join in when a

sentence is repeated in a familiar story.

 

 

Competency 5: Children will understand how books are organized.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Differentiate between the parts of a book (the cover, the title and the end).
  2. Understand and demonstrate the usage and significance of different parts of a

book.

  1. Know that some books tell stories and others give information.
  2. Know that Urdu is read from right to left and top to bottom.
  3. Know that English is read from left to right and top to bottom.
  4. Know that regional languages (where

applicable) are read from right to  left and top to bottom).

This competency will help children understand the different parts/sections of a book, the different kinds of books and the orientation of different languages.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Tell them in a conversational tone, what the different parts of a book are, such as the cover, the end, the spine through

demonstrating the significance and usage of these parts

  • When reading out a story, show them where a sentence begins and which

direction we read in and how we read from top to bottom.

  • Talk to children about different kinds of books explaining that some tell us story and others tell us about so many

different things, such as animals, plants, buildings, and history.

 

Competency 6: Children will recognise letters and familiar words in simple texts.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Understand that words and pictures carry meaning.
  2. Identify and name the characters in a story.
  3. Recognise their names in print (Urdu & English).
  4. Begin to recognise letters of the Alphabet.
  5. Identify      sight     words/high frequency words that are meaningful for them.
  6. Identify letter  sounds  through  words that have personal meaning for them.
  7. Associate initial letter sounds with names of objects in their classroom environment.
  8. Think of a variety of objects beginning with a single letter of the alphabet.
  9. Read aloud with increased accuracy, fluency and expression.

This competency will help children recognise familiar words in simple texts. They will begin to associate sounds with letters of the alphabet and also to recognise letters of the alphabet by shape and sound. They will begin to recognise their own names and other familiar, often repeated words.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Provide a print rich environment.

Children learn to read by trying to make sense      of      the      print                they  come across.Support their efforts by labelling objects and areas in the classroom.

Place plenty of books in the learning

environment for them to look through, and to tell each other their stories.

  • Create symbols for their names and draw these along with the written name on a label which can be pinned (safely) on their clothes. Let them find their own name tags each day when they arrive. When    they     are    confident     and can identify their names easily, remove the symbol and leave only their name on the name tag.

 

Competency 6: Children will recognise letters and familiar words in simple texts.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  • Prepare flash cards with letters of the Alphabet (remember to move from mother tongue to Urdu to English)  and play matching  games.  Match  the  cards to objects and pictures which begin with a particular alphabet. Say the initial alphabetical sounds of objects and match these to sounds of the alphabets present. Begin with words that are personally meaningful for the children like their own name, names of family members, pets, favourite food and places. Keep an ear open for children’s interests and use words that are important for them to  help  them  “read” the respective alphabet and sight words.
  • Teacher will demonstrate reading aloud accuracy, fluency and expression.

 

2.5.3 WRITING SKILLS

Competency 7: Children will use pictures, symbols and familiar letters and words to communicate meaning, show awareness of some (symbols, letters and words), for the di?erent purposes of writing.

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Make marks and scribble to communicate meaning
  2. Use some clearly identifiable letters in their writing to communicate meaning,

representing some sounds correctly and in sequence.

  1. Draw pictures to communicate meaning.
  2. Hold writing tools properly to develop a comfortable and efficient pencil grip.
  3. Colour a simple picture keeping within designated space.
  4. Trace, copy, draw and colour different

shapes,      such      as     circles,                  squares, triangles and rectangles.

  1. Trace and draw vertical, horizontal and wavy lines and simple patterns made up of lines, circles, semi circles and other

simple shapes.

  1. Trace, copy and write the letter of Urdu alphabet.
  2. Trace, copy and write the letters of the English alphabet.

This competency will help children use pictures symbols and familiar letters and words to communicate meaning, showing awareness of some of the different purposes of writing. It will also focus on learning the skills they will need in writing legibly.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Provide a variety of writing and drawing materials (pencils, crayons, chalk etc.) to scribble and make marks on

paper/Slate/takhti  and  sand-paper.

Accept children’s scribbling/drawing as their first attempts at writing. Look

carefully to find letters and images

emerging from their scribbling. Gently, help them to hold their writing tools

correctly; use computers with children’s software where possible.

  • Talk to them about their drawing and

write a word or sentence, exactly as they say it, and then let them trace over it if

they want to. They may return to it the next or another day and “read” what was written. This will help them see that

pictures communicate meaning.

 

2.5.3. WRITING SKILLS

Competency 7: Children will use pictures, symbols and familiar letters and words to communicate meaning, show awareness of some (symbols, letters and words), for the di?erent purposes of writing.

  1. Trace, copy and write the letters of

regional languages (where applicable).

  1. Know that print carries meaning and in English, it is written from left to right,

begins at the top left corner of the page and moves across and down, and words are separated by space.

  1. Know that print carries meaning and in Urdu, it is written from right to left,

begins at the  top  right  corner  of  the page and moves across and down, and words are separated by space.

  1. Write their own names in English & Urdu and their native language with

appropriate use of upper and lower case letters.

  1. Write a word or a sentence while describing a picture.
  2. Articles (a or an)
  • Provide a tray with sand in it. Encourage children to draw lines and  patterns  in the sand and then later on paper. They can trace or copy lines and patterns that have been made for them.
  • Provide practise by writing letters in the air, moving hand in the correct direction asking the children to follow.
  • Give them plenty of opportunities to

trace, draw and colour pictures prepared for them and simple shapes which have been introduced earlier. Let them trace and copy letters of the alphabet (mother tongue, Urdu, English) and their own

names.

 

    1. BASIC MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS

 

Competency 1: Children will develop basic logical, critical, creative and problem solving skills by demon?rating an under?anding of the di?erent attributes of objects (such as colour, size, weight and texture) and match, sequence, sort and classify objects based on one/two attributes.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Recognise, name and differentiate between colours.
  2. Differentiate between the objects on the basis of size, weight, length, width and

textures (smooth & rough).

  1. Arrange objects and later pictures,

according to their size/length, going from smallest to biggest, biggest to

smallest, shortest to longest and longest to shortest and vice versa.

  1. Arrange objects and then pictures,

according to their weight and width,

going from highest to  lowest,  heaviest to lightest and narrowest to widest and vice versa.

This competency requires that children use mathematical language as they explore the similarities and difference between the attributes of objects. It focuses on enhancing children’s thinking skills through pattern identification and through building relationships.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Give the children freedom to explore

patterns and relationship. Give them the opportunity to come up with different

answers or solutions and accept what they come up with.

 

Competency 1: Children will develop basic logical, critical, creative and problem solving skills by demon?rating an under?anding of the di?erent attributes of objects (such as colour, size, weight and texture) and match, sequence, sort and classify objects based on one/two attributes.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

  1. Match and compare one object with another on the basis of similar attributes.
  2. Sort and group objects (classify) based on a single attribute (for e.g.; colour or size etc) and based on two attributes (e.g. colour, weight, size, number of sides).
  3. Observe, identify and extend patterns developed with various concrete materials.
  4. Observe, identify and extend the given picture/symbol patterns.
  5. Group objects together according to their shapes and colours.
  6. Sequence objects according to their size, shapes and colours
  7. Identify and differentiate between broad and narrow
  8. Identify that 'some' is less than 'all'
  9. Differentiate between 'more', 'less' and 'equal.
  10. Differentiate between half and full.
  11. Create own patterns using concrete materials and pictures and then explain them.
  12. Observe and identify the “odd one out” from the given set of concrete material or pictures and explain the answer.
  13. Compare information through simple activities
  • Design various interesting activities

using simple everyday material to help children build their skills. A few ideas are given below:

    • Use concrete materials such as, beads, blocks, and buttons. Help them recognise and describe the attributes of these objects.
    • Ask children to compare the given objects and identity similarities and differences between them.

Encourage them to group various objects and explain the reasons for doing so.

    • Use a variety of materials to help children build their classification skills. For example, give children red and blue beads of the same

size and ask them to sort these in two groups. Later, give them red and blue beads in small and large

sizes and ask them to sort these. In the second case, children may

come up with different ideas. They can make four groups (small red

beads, big red beads, small blue

beads and large blue beads). They may make only two groups (red

beads and blue beads or small

beads and big beads. (Encourage children to consider various

attributes while sorting.

    • Use the concept of sorting and

sequencing in daily class activities, such as making a queue of children in the order of height, dividing the children for various group

activities,  organizing  class

materials in boxes and arranging books in various piles.

    • Use low cost materials, such as,

beads, nut shells, ice cream sticks and pebbles for pattern seeking

exercises. Start by showing a few

patterns to children, and then engage them in extending the given patterns and developing their own patterns

using concrete materials and pictures.

  •    Engage children in developing birthday chart as pictograph and ask questions which month has the  most  Birthdays and which has the least birthdays etc.

 

 

Competency 1: Children will develop basic logical, critical, creative and problem solving skills by demon?rating an under?anding of the di?erent attributes of objects (such as colour, size, weight and texture) and match, sequence, sort and classify objects based on one/two attributes.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  • Engage children in observing the

environment and identifying various

patterns. For example, pattern on floor tiles (one red tile and one blue tile)

pattern of lines and flowers on various

clothes and patterns of day and night and daily routine of the child.

 

Competency 2: Children will develop a basic under?anding of quantity, counting up to

50 and simple number operations of 0-9.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Differentiate between some and all from a given set of objects, and understand that some is less than all.
  2. Understand one to one correspondence.
  3. Count up to 50 orally.
  4. Use numbers to represent quantities in daily life interaction.
  5. Compare quantities of objects in different sets and describe which sets are equal, which have more objects, and which have lesser objects than another.
  6. Begin to develop an understanding  of the concept of zero (meaning nothing).
  7. Identify and write correct numerals to represent numbers from 0-50.
  8. Sequence numerals correctly from 0-50.
  9. Practice backward counting(10-1)
  10. Identify which numeral represents a bigger quantity or lesser quantity.
  11. Identify ordinal numbers up to ten.
  12. Tell number stories to build the concept of “more” and “less” using concreate objects.
  13. Use concrete objects to develop the concept of addition and subtraction
  14. Substitute numerals for concrete objects during the process of addition.
  15. Use the concept of addition in their daily lives with oral examples.
  16. Remove the identified number of objects from a given set, and tell how many objects are left in the set.
  17. Substitute numerals for concrete object during the process of subtraction.

This competency focuses on nurturing children’s emerging number concepts, through concrete experiences. It aims to develop an understanding of basic numbers and simple mathematical operations.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Encourage children to sing number

songs     and     poems,     count               different objects in the environment, count while bouncing a ball /clap / jump.

  • Engage children in hands-on activities to help them build an understanding of

numbers and their numeral representation.

  • Provide manipulative material, such as counting bars, small blocks, balls,

spoons, ice-cream sticks and engage

children in sorting the given objects in groups; counting the number of objects in each group; comparing the quantities in the various groups; and identifying

which one has more objects than the other, which has less and which two groups have equal numbers.

  • Provide daily opportunities to the

children to count and recount objects in the environment.

  • Encourage children to compare

relationships between quantities in their daily life. Ask question to stimulate

thinking. For example:

 

Competency 2: Children will develop a basic under?anding of quantity, counting up to

50 and simple number operations of 0-9.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  1. Use the concept of subtraction in their daily lives with oral examples.
  2. Identify the signs of addition and equals to.
  3. Introduce and apply the addition and subtraction signs to  add  or  subtract from 0 till 9 with a single digit answer. Use concreate objects and other ways to support the process.
  4. Use mathematical language while talking to children, such as, add/subtract and makes/left to describe the process of addition and subtraction.
  1. Get familiar with the concept of Odd and Even number
  • Are there more brown objects or black objects in our class?
  • Are there more girls or more boys in our class?
  • Do more children in our class like bananas or do more like apples?
  • Give two sets of materials (such as, cups and spoons) to children, and ask them to arrange them in one to one

correspondence.

  • Introduce numeral representation once children have developed a good sense of numbers and their values. For example, count objects and show its numerals to children on a card or on the board; give number cards (cards on which different numerals form 1-9 are written) and

various objects to children and engage them in: sorting the objects in groups; counting the objects in each group; and

placing the right number card alongside each group.

  • Develop a worksheet to practice what comes before, after and in between also organize the role play to clear the concept of before, after
  • Give children picture cards and number cards and engage them in counting the number of pictures in each card, and

matching the picture cards with their corresponding number cards.

  • Engage children in various activities using concrete materials to build the concept of addition and subtraction.
  • Provide opportunities to use addition andsubtraction in daily life. For example, Ali has two books. Asma has three books.How many books does that make? Saima had four biscuits. She ate two now, how many biscuits does she have?
  • Use mathematical language to describe number operations and encourage

children to do the same.

  • Use different objects like large buttons, pebbles or small blocks to clear the concept that even numbers make pair and odd numbers not

 

Competency 3: Children will recognise basic geometrical shapes and the position of objects in relation to each other and surroundings

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Recognise, name and draw two

dimensional shapes, such as circle, oval, square, rectangle or triangle, using

features     such    as    number     of sides, curved

or straight.

  1. Recognize and name 3-D shapes such as sphere, cube, cuboid cylinder and cone using features such as number of faces, flat or curved faces
  2. Identify the shapes in their environment.
  3. Draw object of their own choice using various shapes.
  4. Develop understanding and describe the position and order of objects using

position words such as, in front of,

behind, up, down, under, inside, outside, between and next to.

This competency will help children to develop a sense of shape and space. It emphasizes the provision of hands-on experience to understand the position of objects in space.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Provide several sets of  shape  cards  in the same colour, and ask children to sort the cards using their own criteria; describe the sorting process they adopted and talk about the criteria they used; and name each shape.  Children may use and name each shape. Children may use various names, and at this stage their  methods  and  answers  need to be accepted regardless of their accuracy.
  • Introduce 2-D and 3-D shapes and their proper names. Involve children in

identifying and talking about similarities and differences of the shapes.

  • Provide easily available material to build models.
  • Take children on a ‘shape walk’ looking

for geometric shapes in the environment.

  • Provide experiences in making  shapes with natural and recycled   materials, such as, clay, string and ice-cream sticks.
  • Introduce and use various position words to describe the position of objects in daily activities. For example, Akram is putting the ball on the table; Salma has put the pencil next to her book; Zehra is standing between Ali and Asma.
  • Engage children in various games in which they give instructions to each other using position words.
  • Involve children in describing pictures using positional words.

 

 

Competency 4: Children will develop an under?anding of measurement.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Describe and compare objects using

length; weight, height and temperature (hot & cold) as measurement attributes.

  1. Observe various objects and estimate their weight and length.
  2. Verify their estimations using simple tools.
  3. Understand informal time units and

know that clocks and calendars mark the passage of time.

  1. Sequence events in time and anticipate events.
  2. Recognize  Pakistani Currency and coins

 

  1. Will begin to interpret the concept of set

This competency emphasizes developing basic ideas about measurement and measuring attributes through hands-on experiences.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Provide concrete materials to children such as long and short pencil, strips of

paper or strings, heavy and light blocks, toys and pebbles and engage them in

comparing and describing the

relationship between these objects,

using words such as, longer or shorter than, heavier or lighter than. Height

chart may be used to give the concept of height.

  • To lead children towards estimating the measurements, show them a few objects and ask questions, such as, which one

seems to be the heaviest/lightest, longest/shortest? To verify their

estimations, use simple tools such as,

their own hand span, a simple balance, rope or scale.

  • Using a calendar indicates special days, months, birthdays and use  terms  such as yesterday, today or tomorrow. Use a clock in the daily routine to anticipate

what will happen next. Anticipate how many months before Ramadan and Eid, summer holidays, going to the next class, vand other events that are of relevance to the children.

  • Create a simple analogue clock by using card-paper with moveable hands and use it to teach the concept of time such as time for coming to school, time  for break and pack-up time etc.
  • Give them opportunity to adjust the hands of clock according to the

above-mentioned directions, on their own.

  • Organize an activity of buying and selling by creating a mini shop in the classroom
  • Using examples from daily life to make children understand the concept of set for example sofa set,tea set etc.

 

 

    1. WORLD AROUND US

 

Competency 1: Children will develop an under?anding of how families are important

and talk about their family history.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Talk about their family members and each one’s role and importance to the well-being of the family.
  2. Know information about their family

members (name, job, contact number).

  1. Talk about their family history, like their grandparents, such as where they belong to and what they used  to  do, their food, language etc.
  2. Identify various ways of showing love and respect for family members.

This competency is designed to help children recognise the importance of family relationships and to learn more about their own families and those of their peers.

The key processes children can be engaged in, are the collection and sharing of information about their family.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • A form will be developed by the school to collect the basic  information  about the child and family for the record.
  • Talk to children about their family members and about their roles and

responsibilities. This can be initiated by choosing stories based on family

relationships.

  • Help children think of a few questions

they could ask their family members, in order to learn more about  them,  such as, their likes and dislikes, hobbies and favourite food etc. Children can talk to

their family members at home, to their family members away from home by

telephone or e-mail, and then share the collected information with their peers in small groups in class. Children can also bring photographs of their family

members to show to their friends and make a family tree.

  • Help children think of ways in which they can show their family that they love and respect them.
  • Help children by involving parents to enable them to share their parent’s

name, job, address and contact number.

  • Parents, siblings and grandparents

should be encouraged to come to the class to be part of class activities.

 

Competency 2: Children will develop an under?anding of the people and places around

them.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Talk about various community members and explore their roles.
  2. Recognise places in the community and talk about    their          purpose and importance.
  3. Talk about food, water and clothes.

Discuss where they come from, who

brings them to markets and homes and how they get there.

  1. Identify and explore various means of communication and transportation.

This competency focuses on exploration and enhanced understanding of the environment. It also focuses on helping children realize the importance of community structures and their services to the community.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Help children identify and learn more about community members, who are

most relevant to their context. These may be the people who provide services to others such as, lady health visitors,

carpenters,  cobblers,   milkmen, sweepers, doctors, drivers, tailors.

  • Help children identify and learn more

about community places (school, library, clinic/hospitals/dispensary, shopping

malls/markets, post office, cinema,

banks, parks, museum, zoo, mosque,

airport, railway station, bus stop), which are significant in their local community.

  • Take children on field trips where they can observe the places and talk to the people there.
  • Invite various community members to

class to talk about their work. Encourage children to have discussions with them.

  • Pick a few necessities of daily life and

engage children in reflecting and talking about their sources. For examples,

teachers can choose ‘Bread’ as a topic

and ask questions to help children trace the path to its source:

    • Where do you think we get bread from?
    • I wonder where bakers get bread from?
    • What do you think bread is made from?
    • Where does flour come from?
  • Organize interesting exploration

activities to help children learn about communication and transport. Engage them in observing various modes of

transportation. Ask them to compare these, and sort them in groups using their own criteria. Discuss with them

their reasons for why they sorted as they did.

 

 

Competency 2: Children will develop an under?anding of the people and places around

them.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  • Give children a choice of drawing or

making clay  models  of  imaginary  forms of       transport.      Encourage       children      to come up with their own ideas. Talk to them       about             their       experiences  of travelling and mode of  commutation such as Letter, post card, telephone, e-mail, text message. Involve children in collecting pictures of different places mentioned       above         (like                 museum, hospital, post office, railway station etc) from newspapers, sticker charts or other means and share with their  friends  in the classroom. This activity can also be designed as group presentations.

 

Competency 3: Children will recognise the di?erences between living and non-living

things.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Understand the concept of living things and name a few of them.
  2. Understand the concept of non-living things and name a few of them
  3. Identify and differentiate between living and non-living things

This competency is designed to give the concept of living and non-living things.

Teachers    can    facilitate     learning     in the

following ways:

  • Use concrete examples to demonstrate

living and non-living things. For example, pet animals, small rocks, insects, blocks and things in the environment

  • Help children  to  differentiate  between all living and non-living things  using flash cards
  • Organise an outdoor activity within the school premises to identify and name

living and non-living things.

 

Competency 4: Children will recognise the plants and animals in their environment and explore their basic features and habitat.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Recognise animals and explore their basic features.
  2. Compare a variety of animals to identify similarities and differences and to sort

them into groups, using their own criteria.

  1. Recognise plants and explore their basic parts. Know that there are different types of plants. Some are indoor while some are outdoor. Some can be grown in pots while others grow as big trees. Plants produce flowers and fruits.
  2. Talk about the significance of animals and plants for human beings and their relationships with each other.
  3. Practice how to take care of animals, plants and birds.
  4. Know that all living things have different types of homes. Some live on land, some live in water and some live in nests.
  5. Know that some animals are  friendly (pet animals), some are useful (farm animals), some are dangerous (wild animal)

This competency is designed to engage children in the careful observation and comparison of various animals and plants in their surroundings. It also aims to develop a caring and loving attitude towards animals and plants. Teachers can facilitate learning in the

following ways:

  • Read or tell  animal  and  plant  stories, and talk to children about their observations and experiences with animals and plants.
  • Ask children  to  observe  local  animals and their basic features, such as, body parts, sounds, habits, food and homes.
  • Organise a trip to a nearby park to observe different types and sizes of plants/trees and insects.
  • Organise field trips to the zoo to see

animals that  are  not  locally  observable. In the classroom, they can depict various animal movements.

  • Help children recognise  the  main  parts of plants, such as, root, stem, leaves,

flowers and seeds and compare the parts of various plants. Give them the

opportunity to touch, smell and feel the different textures of leaves, and talk

about similarities and differences. Help them to grow seeds even in small

pots/jars

  • Learn about different types of habitats of animals).
  • Encourage children to reflect on and share ideas about actions which are harmful for animals and plants, for

example, beating animals and plucking flowers and leaves from their stems.

Discuss ways of showing respect and care for animals and plants. Talk to children about organisations (WWF etc) and people who love and protect plants and animals.

  • Involve children in a role play to show how to take care of all living things

(animals and plants).

 

 

Competency 5: Children will observe the weather and develop under?anding of the seasons and their signi?cance to people.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Observe and describe daily weather conditions.
  2. Record daily weather condition on a weather chart using symbols.
  3. Describe key features of different

seasons, based on observations and experiences.

  1. Explore and discuss how the changing seasons affect our food, clothes and

lifestyles.

  1. Explore and discuss how climate change affects our environment (Global

warming, pollution, natural and human made disaster).

This competency focuses on helping children understand their environment by becoming good environmental observers and explorers.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Spend a few minutes each day, talking

about the daily weather conditions, using simple indicators such as sunny, cloudy, warm, cold, rainy, windy, dry, or humid day.

  • Use simple symbols/pictures to help children record the weather. For

example, put up a big chart in the class with boxes for each day and ask children to draw and  place  appropriate  symbols in the relevant box to record their observations.

  • Engage children in discussions, during winter, about food, clothes and lifestyle related to winter. In summer, design

activities to facilitate children to explore summer and help them notice how

various aspects of our life changes with the change in seasons.

  • Show them pictorial display and/or video to know the harmful effects of cutting

trees and pollution caused by plastic bags, smoke, putting fire on rubbish.

  • Engage children in discussion to understand the harmful effects of above-mentioned actions.
  • Engage the children in activity of planting, adopting a tree and know the importance of plantation.

 

 

Competency 6: Children will develop a caring attitude towards the environment.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Understand the need for clean air and how to prevent air pollution.
  2. Understand the importance of water, its uses and the need to conserve it.
  3. Identify pleasant and unpleasant sounds leading to an awareness of noise pollution.
  4. Discuss and implement the careful use of resources/materials in everyday life.
  5. Explore alternate uses of waste material.
  6. Identify practices that are useful and

harmful to the environment and suggest alternatives to harmful practices.

This competency focuses on nurturing children’s abilities to think critically about sustainable development. Identifying problems, thinking of alternatives, generating diverse solutions and asking and responding to open-ended questions, as the key processes in which children need to be engaged.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Work with children on environmental

print puzzles, jigsaw puzzle and riddles f or general problem-solving activities.

Select tasks which can be solved in a variety of ways, which have optional solutions, instead of just one correct answer.

  • Indulge children in activities which

encourage them to think of alternatives for recycling and safe disposal. For

examples, ask children to think of various possible uses for an empty plastic bottle, an old calendar, an empty carton or biscuit box.

  • Discuss and share ideas for replacing

environmentally harmful practices with better alternatives. For example, use of cloth/paper bag instead of plastic bags.

  • Engage children in answering

open-ended questions which are

imaginary and from daily life, such as

    1. If you could choose, would you

rather be a flower or a bird? Why?

    1. What would happen if all the toys disappeared from the world?
    2. What would you do if you saw two of your friends fighting in the

playground?

    1. What would you do if your teacher was not in the class and your friend got hurt?
    2. Engage children in appropriate use of dustbin in school, home and public.

 

 

Competency 7: Children will recognise and identify natural resources and physical features of Earth.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Introduce and explain with  example from real life;
    • Different       physical     features        like mountains, desert, forests, sea, etc.
    • Natural resources such as water, wind, forests and minerals
  2. Name at least three natural resources and three physical features of earth.

This competency focuses on developing abilities to observe and differentiate amongst land features around them. It also sensitises them towards the importance of land diversity and importance of its conservation.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Use stories and poems about mountains, jungles, sea, rivers, deserts etc.
  • Encourage children to share their experiences if they have seen any of these resources and features.
  • Use flash cards to make children familiar with the names and pictures (of natural resources/physical features)
  • Encourage children to talk with their family about these natural

resources/physical  features.

  • Involve children in the discussion  to know the safe and responsible use of resources like water, electricity and gas. For example, switch off the light, fan and other electric appliances, before leaving the space and turn off the tap after use.

 

Competency 8: Children will be able to explore and use basic types of technology.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Name and Explore different types of technology like television, computer, mobile phone, i-pad, iron, blender, washing machine etc.
  2. Learn basic use of different types of technology devices
  3. Understand the advantages and

disadvantages of using technology

This competency focuses on the safe use of technology for learning purposes.

Teachers    can    facilitate     learning     in the

following ways:

  • Provide children with the exposure to a variety of technology devices.
  • Let children explore these devices under adult supervision.
  • Teacher will ensure the learning of

different concepts through the use of technology.

  • Teachers should use technology to motivate students and allow them to

learn and share their understanding in fun and unique ways.

  • Teacher will ensure to highlight the

advantages and disadvantages of using technology devices.

 

    1. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Competency 1: Children will develop a sense of balance, agility and coordination.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Move in a number of ways, such as

running, jumping, skipping, sliding and hopping.

  1. Learn balancing, walk on a straight and curved line, zig zag and asked directions by using bean bags and other articles.
  2. Move around, under, over, along and through balancing and climbing

equipment.

  1. Refine and improve their movements as they repeat actions.
  2. Develop gross motor skills and flexibility through physical exercise, such as

stretching, bending and other drills. Learn and understand how different body parts can move.

  1. Move through spaces with  consideration of other children/people and objects in the environment.
  2. Show respect for other children’s personal space while playing.
  3. Development of  spatial  intelligence.
  4. Demonstrate the control necessary to

hold objects or hold themselves in fixed positions for a couple of minutes.

  1. Explore a variety of ways to represent

ideas through actions and movements.

  1. Explore the use of personal  space  and set

the rules for using the general space in the room/play ground

  1. Ensure health and safety activities throughout the day, in different

segments of daily routine.

This competency focuses on children’s developing physical control, mobility and awareness of space in indoor and outdoor environments. It includes establishing a positive attitude towards a healthy, active way of life.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Monitor children’s  height  and  weight  on a monthly basis and keep the record.

Identify the children who are falling

behind in physical growth according to

the National Health Standards and make parents aware of it.

  • Help children learn to balance by

engaging them to walk with a  book, bean bag on his/her head and a spoon having different small objects holding in his/her mouth.

  • Object chosen for different activities are not sharp or pointed and they are clean.
  • Model healthy and safe practices and promote healthy lifestyles for children.
  • Provide safe spaces and opportunities for children to walk, run and climb every day.
  • Provide opportunities to throw a ball at a certain distance, walk backwards,  climb on a ladder and stairs, and jump over

small objects with balance and control.

  • Support children in using outdoor gross motor equipment such as swings and

climbing frames, safely and appropriately.

  • Encourage both girls and boys to participate in active play.
  • Participate in gross motor activities

during transition time, from the segment of the daily routine to another. For example, “hop to the table” or “jump five times while you wait to wash your hands.”

  • Encourage and promote children to play local games for example: Pithu garam,

chuppan chuppaiee, staphu, laal pari, kho kho etc.

 

Competency 2: Children will have increased hand-eye coordination and the ability to

handle tools and materials e?ectively.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Use a range of child-appropriate tools with increasing control and confidence.
  2. Handle flexible/mouldable materials safely with increasing control.
  3. Show increasing control over their daily chores.
  4. Able to manipulate small objects with

ease (string beads, fit small objects into holes), pick up small objects with fingers.

This competency focuses on developing children’s skills to accomplish tasks and activities that require balance and safe handling of tools and objects.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Provide opportunities to use simple tools such as, scissors, thread, paper knives, hammers and screw drivers with extreme care.
  • Provide sensory experiences to children such as water and sand play where

children can pour, fill and empty.

  • Organise activities which involved

ressing-up using varied fasteners,  such as,        buttons,      hooks,     laces    and zips. Involve children in opening and closing bottle caps, boxes and bags of various designs and sizes.

  • Check the environment every day to

ensure that healthy and  safe  practices are followed. Review safety rules before involving children in activities, such as

cutting, so that children are conscious of themselves while working.

 

Competency 3: Children will develop sensory motor skills.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Differentiate between smells bad, good, strong, light, fruity, flowery, pungent
  2. Differentiate between different tastes; sweet, bitter, salty, sour, and spicy.
  3. Differentiate between textures; smooth, rough, hard, soft, silky, fluffy, bumpy,

slimy

  1. Enhance observation skills by looking at the environment around them
  2. Differentiate between different sounds; loud, soft, shrilly.
  3. Differentiate between different temperatures hot, cold, warm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The main focus of this competency is to help children through a variety of activities to develop their sensory skills:

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Take a bag full of different objects with different textures (mystery bag) to be

given to children and they will identify by just putting their hand inside  the  bag and will identify the objects without looking into the bag.

  • Introduce different smells through

opaque jars containing different smelling objects such as onion, garlic, swab of perfume, vinegar, talcum powder, soap etc. Children will smell each jar and identify the smell like bad, good, strong, light, fruity, flowery, pungent etc.

 

Competency 3: Children will develop sensory motor skills.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  • Teacher will place an object on the table and will ask the children to describe it in 2 to 3 sentences verbally. Teacher will

show different pictures to the children and will ask them to describe those

pictures. Children will be asked to name objects in the class.

  • Teacher may involve children in different activities and games to identify different sounds; for example, tapping table,

bouncing ball, clapping, musical

instruments, dropping things, sounds in the environment etc.

    1. HEALTH HYGIENE AND SAFETY

 

Competency 1: Children will develop an under?anding of the importance of healthy,

safe and hygienic practices.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Demonstrate an awareness of healthy lifestyle practices.
  2. Take care of their personal hygiene

(cutting nails, keeping hair clean and tidy, keeping teeth clean, taking bath, proper use of toilet, wiping runny nose and keeping belongings clean.)

  1. Wash hands before and after meals, after using the toilet and as and when required.
  2. Identify healthy and unhealthy food.
  3. Identify people in the community who care for health needs.
  4. Understand the importance of nutrition
  5. Understand the importance of clean water.
  6. Learn healthy eating habits.

The main focus of this competency is on health, hygiene, safety, security and wellbeing.

Teachers    can    facilitate     learning     in the

following ways:

  • Model hygienic and safe practices and read stories about healthy lifestyle.
  • Discuss how germs are spread. Talk

about not buying snacks from vendors who do not use covers, and allow flies to sit on the food which in turn spread

diseases. Discuss the hazards of spitting in the surroundings and the risks of

smoking and air pollution.

  • Talk about the importance of washing hands (seven steps of washing hands), keeping their bodies clean, brushing

teeth regularly and wearing clean

clothes. Demonstrate these practices

through      action     rhymes,                  role         plays, stories and songs.

  • Engage children in a discussion on food types. Over a  period  of  time,  children can talk about benefits of  healthy  food and harmful effects of junk food for example the hazards of eating meethi-chalia, chewing gum, excessive intake of oily foods, sweets/toffees and fizzy drinks. Motivate children to bring healthy lunch.

 

Competency 1: Children will develop an under?anding of the importance of healthy,

safe and hygienic practices.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  • Encourage children to drink milk and

plenty of clean drinking water. Talk about clinics, hospitals, doctors, dentists and other health professional and their role in society.

  • Involve parents in different school activities to promote healthy eating habits
  • Prepare and maintain a personal hygiene checklist  through  which children are marked daily.
  • Establish a physically and emotionally safe environment where children know

they can talk about how they are feeling.

  • Discuss safety rules on a regular basis, before starting an activity or going

outdoors to play. Discuss hitting,

touching others, being touched (and not liking it) pushing, being considerate and walking slowly in a queue, so as not to

bump into others.

  • Discuss and put up pictorial

messages/signs in the classroom about broken wires, loose switch, sharp edges and tools, door and windows handling

and broken glass, climbing fence  in parks and schools.

  • Display safety rules/ signs on a prominent place in the classroom.

 

Competency 2: Children will develop an understanding of personal safety and security.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Know and express in situations where

they need to report or ask for help, such as bullying/violence.

  1. Demonstrate an understanding on

private body parts (good touch and bad touch)

  1. Understand that except their  parents and doctor no one else can touch those body parts
  2. Understand that they must report to parents and teacher immediately if

someone touches them inappropriately

This competency focuses of promoting self-awareness of personal safety and security to help them safeguard themselves from unseen/unpleasant happenings in their environment.

Teachers   can    facilitate    learning    in    the

following ways:

  • Telling short stories from daily life and fiction.
  • Show videos related to know the

importance of being careful from the unpleasant and uncomfortable

happenings.

 

Competency 2: Children will develop an understanding of personal safety and security.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

  1. Encourage children to shout and say “NO” when someone tries to touch

inappropriately.

  1. Understand that they should not
    • talk to strangers
    • go with strangers
    • take anything from strangers
    • go out alone
  2. Recognise that some humanmade and natural disasters are dangerous.
  3. Express needs and feelings (hungry, thirsty, need to go to toilet etc.)
  4. Explore ways of dealing with issues through role play
  5. Learn to cross a road carefully
  6. Aware of harmful effects of taking

medicines  without  adults’  supervision

  1. Seek (trusted) adults’ help whenever required
  1. Recognise and follow basic safety rules.
  2. Identify and seek adult help if feeling

unwell, hurt, unhappy or uncomfortable.

  • Keep themselves safe and to know what to do in an emergency.
  • Discussion with children on how to respond in situations where they are being bullied/hit or any other type of violence by peers or older children or adults.
  • Discussion with children about private body parts and how good touch is

different from bad touch.

  • Role plays to emphasize the importance of being careful of strangers.
  • Help children practice various safety

drills such as lock down, evacuation and fire rescue drills etc.

  • Help children how to use appliances safely.
  • Giving children responsibility to  switch off lights, fans, heaters and water taps when they are not in use (in schools, homes and public places)

 

    1. CREATIVE ARTS

 

Competency 1: Children will express themselves through the use of drawings and colours.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Hold crayons, colour, pencils, paint brush correctly.
  2. Recognise and use a variety of mediums and colours to express their imagination and observations.
  3. Use a variety of lines, colours, shapes and textures to express ideas and feelings in their drawings, paintings, construction and craft works.
  4. Recognise colours and use them to express their thoughts and feelings.
  5. Identify a variety of art tools, materials, techniques            and demonstrate understanding of their suitable and safe use (brushes, fingers, sponges for painting, markers, pencils, crayons for

This competency focuses on helping children to initiate the process of building their skills and understanding of drawing and colours. It does not require proficiency in drawing specific objects or to use colours with great skill. Emphasis should be placed on the enhancement of children’s confidence to use colours and various drawing tools for self-expression.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Introduce a variety of drawing mediums

such as, crayons, charcoal, paint, chalk, and    drawing            tools            on            children’s computer software (where possible) and provide children with opportunities to experiment with all of them.

 

Competency 1: Children will express themselves through the use of drawings and colours.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

drawing,      modelling      clay     for making sculptures)

f. Talk about their own art work and those of their peers

g. Practice art work by using technology

Give children the assurance that they can draw anything they like, and can use colours of their own choice.

  • Introduce a variety of colours, including black, and provide opportunities for

children to explore these colours by

mixing them in water and applying them on large sheets of paper and newspaper.

Give children the freedom to express

their thoughts and feelings through the use of these colours.

  • Provide sufficient time for children to

work on their painting. Encourage them to talk about the process  of  creating their

art pieces and their finished product.

  • Display children’s paintings in the class, and place samples in each child’s

portfolio.

  • Talk about their own art work and those of their peers for example:
    1. What the art work is about?
    2. What they think the lines, shapes and colours represent etc.?

Use available resource i.e. tablets, computers etc to practice art work.

 

Competency 2: Children will work with a variety of low cost and no cost/ waste material to create craft project of their choice.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Share ideas for creating various objects from low/no cost material.
  2. Create objects of their own choice using a variety of waste and indigenous

materials         collected                        from                        their immediate surroundings.

  1. Use various art techniques, such as,

drawing, colouring, collage  or  printing to create their craft work.

  1. Talk about the process of constructing their craft project, giving reasons for choice of materials.

This competency focuses on nurturing children’s creativity, decision making skills, and confidence in their choice of materials.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Ask children to collect waste material

such as, pieces of cloth, empty tissue

boxes, new straws, pencil shavings and nut shells, from their home, school and neighbourhood.

  • Involve children in sorting the collected materials and organizing them in boxes and jars. It is important to place all the material within easy access of children.

Materials for colouring, sticking and

cutting should also be made available.

 

Competency 2: Children will work with a variety of low cost and no cost/ waste material to create craft project of their choice.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

 

  • Invite children to share ideas for creating new projects.
  • Encourage them to decide what they want to make and to work in pairs or groups, if they choose to.
  • Provide sufficient time for children to

work on their projects, and  to  discuss the process and the product. Display

children’s final products in the class.

When possible place samples of work in each child’s portfolio.

  • Encourage them to make unique stuff using their imaginations.
  • Organize  an  exhibition/gallery  walk

where students can display and present their work.

 

Competency 3: Children will experiment with a variety of materials to represent their observations and imagination, in the form of models/sculptures.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Feel comfortable and enjoy engaging with clay, Papier-mâché and other

available modelling materials like play dough and slime.

  1. Create  various  sculptures/models.
  2. Colour or decorate their models if they choose to do so.

This competency focuses on nurturing children’s creative abilities by engaging them in designing and developing models/sculpture) using clay, papier-mâché, and other available modelling materials.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Engage children in thinking about their

ideas and providing them the material, freedom, and encouragement to create sculptures of their own choice.

  • Provide freedom of selection of

modelling material and be able to give their reason of selection.

  • Provide sufficient time for children to

work on their projects, and  to  discuss the process and the product. Display

children’s final products in the class and encourage them to present their work as well as appreciate/comment on others’ projects.

 

Competency 4: Children will learn the skills of collage work and printing and use these in a variety of ways to create their own art pieces and patterns developing their ?ne motor skills.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Identify a variety of material for collage making.
  2. Make personal choices from the available material for creating their own collage.
  3. Create their collage by pasting materials of their own choice.
  4. Identify a variety of material for printing.
  5. Make personal choices from the available material for creating their own art work.
  6. Create own patterns and designs using different techniques for printing.

This competency focuses on nurturing children’s creative abilities and thinking, through collage work and printing. Like other competencies, it emphasizes on children’s choice and decision making for creating designs and use of material. The competency also focuses on the development of fine motor skills.

Teachers    can    facilitate     learning     in the following ways:

  • Involve children in the collection of

materials for collage work, such as, pieces of paper and cloth, old

photographs magazine cut-outs, cotton wool, used buttons and pencil shavings. For printing, collect materials, such as,

thread, sponges and tops of vegetables that are usually thrown away.

  • Place all the collected materials and other necessary items such as glue,

scissors, paper and colours, in a place

which can be easily accessed by children.

  • Show the children some samples of

collage work prior to the activity day/ during story time. Engage them in

thinking about their ideas for collage work.

  • Encourage children to develop their own collage by selecting materials of their own choice.
  • Demonstrate a variety of printing

techniques such as: sponge printing,

stamping (with wooden stamps, rubber stamps)       thread        printing, bubble printing,      hand/foot      printing, flower/ leaf/vegetables      printing                   and             block printing.

  • Engage children in the process of

developing their own prints, using their own choice of techniques.

  • Provide sufficient time for children to work on their projects, discuss the

process and the product. Display

children’s final products in the class.

When possible, place samples of work in each child’s portfolio.

 

 

Competency 5: Children will observe, practice and explore various techniques of folding, cutting, pasting, tearing and weaving paper to make objects and patterns.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Examples and ideas for implementation

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Fold paper in a variety of ways.
  2. Observe adults and practice using

various techniques of paper cutting and paper folding to make simple  objects and designs.

  1. Explore various ways to make different objects by folding and cutting paper.
  2. Cut and paste various materials

This competency focuses on paper art for the expression of children’s creativity and imagination. Like other competencies the elements of imagination, choice and decision making are critical ones.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Demonstrate the art of paper folding

step by step, for example, how to fold

paper in halves, quarters, diagonals, etc. with increasing precision.

  • Organise activities where children can

practice paper folding and making a few simple objects such as, a fan or a boat with the help of demonstrations. Later, encourage them to explore their own

techniques to make objects. Encourage them to manipulate the paper in various ways.

  • Demonstrate and engage children in paper weaving to develop patterns by

varying the width and colour of strips or to make objects, such as, mats.

  • Help children to cut and paste various materials such as chart paper, glazed paper etc to make designs
  • Provide sufficient time for children to work on their projects, discuss the

process and the product. Display

children’s final products in the class.

When possible place samples of work in each child’s portfolio.

  • Let the children clean up the place and put the materials on its respective places at the end of all activities

 

 

2.10.2 SOUND, RHYTHM AND ACTION

Competency 6: Children will listen to, identify and appreciate a variety of sound patterns, rhythms and rhymes as a form of expression.

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Listen to and identify sounds and rhythms in their surroundings.
  2. Experiment with different sound

producing objects and observe the

differences in the sounds produced by them.

  1. Produce sound patterns/rhythms by counting out beats.
  2. Explore the sounds made by various musical instruments.
  3. Recite poems, folk songs, national songs in chorus and solo.
  4. Children     will     perform poems        with actions

This competency focuses on developing children’s sense of sound in terms of rhythm and rhyme, using a variety of objects from their environment.

Teachers can facilitate learning in the following ways:

  • Collect several sound producing objects

such as, wooden and metallic spoons, wooden sticks, hard plastic tubes,

metallic and plastic bowls.

  • Engage children in exploring sounds

produced by various objects when they are struck with another object, (such as a spoon or stick) or tapped with the

fingers. Provide opportunities to explore the difference in sound when a

bottle/container is filled with different levels of water and when it is empty.

  • Engage children in producing repetitive sounds using various objects, leading to musical patterns. For examples, gently

tapping a metallic bowl and plastic cup with a metallic spoon in sequence and

listening to the sound and then changing the sequence and observing the difference.

  • Demonstrate beats and rhythms by clapping out number patterns, for

example, 1-2-3 stop 1-2-3 stop. These

beats can then be played out by tapping or shaking various sound producing

objects.

  • Engage children in reciting poems, folk songs and national songs in chorus and in solo with rhythm and appropriate

actions and expressions by depicting kindness, help, love and friendliness

  • Sound boxes/shakers can be made with empty boxes, grains and pebbles.
  • Teacher will recite poems with actions and children will follow.

 

2.10.3 DRAMATIC PLAY

Competency 7: Children will participate with increasing con?dence in a variety of

dramatic play activities to express themselves.

By the end of the year children will begin to:

  1. Explore and enact a variety of roles.
  2. Imitate the movements they observe in nature, and of various modes of

transport.

  1. Perform/depict a variety of roles and situations in front of the class with

increasing  confidence.

  1. Dramatize role plays/ stories,  poems and folk tales individually, and in groups.
  2. Enact daily experiences and fantasy while working   /playing   cooperatively with other children.

This competency focuses on building children’s confidence, enhancing their imagination and nurturing creative expression by encouraging them to participate in dramatic play activities. Teachers    can    facilitate     learning     in the

following ways:

  • Help children to develop the confidence to participate in dramatic play activities by engaging them in various  activities like mimicking and enacting games such as:
    • ‘Let’s pretend to be…’ In this game, children identify an object and try to mimic it. For example, ‘let’s

pretend to be a train’: children can make a line and enact the

movement and sound of a train. In the same way, encourage children to depict animal movement and

sounds, plants swing in the wind, the different waves/movements of

water, aeroplane and whatever else they can think of. Children can

enact the roles of various family members and the occupations of community members, such as,

parents and grandparents, a doctor, a carpenter, a

laundryman/dhobi, a tailor or a policeman.

    • ‘Guessing games,’ in these games, children think of a situation, a

person or an object. The chosen subject is depicted in front of the

other children and they try to guess what is being enacted.

    • Engage children in acting out poems and stories by selecting roles for themselves.
    • Children can be invited to

represent their own imaginations through role play. For examples,

children can develop a role play to depict ‘If I were a magician, I

would…’

 

 

    1. Concepts

      SUMMARY OF KEY LEARNING AREAS AND COMPETENCIES

 

Key Learning Areas

Competencies

 

 

 

Personal, Social and Emotoinal Development

Competency 1: Children will develop an understanding of their likes, dislikes, strengths, emotions and self-grooming, decision making and problem-solving skills. Children will further enhance their  positive sense of self-identity and see themselves as capable learners.

Competency 2: Children will be willing to share and work in collaboration with their peers, teachers, family members and neighbours, regardless of any differences, such as, in gender, ability, culture, language and ethnicity.

Competency 3:  Children will learn about and appreciate their heritage and culture and develop acceptance, respect and appreciation for the diversity of cultures and languages.

Competency 4: Children will develop an understanding of their own religious values and practices as well as the appreciation, respect and acceptance for others’ religious values and practices

Competency 5: Children will demonstrate a sense of responsibility for self and others in class, school, home and neighbourhood.

Competency 6: Children will use common courtesy expressions like greetings, please, thank you, sorry, excuse me.

Competency 7: Children will learn and develop a sense of citizenship. Competency 8: Children will develop and demonstrate ethical and moral values such as honesty, inner accountability, social  justice, empathy, compassion and respect.

 

 

 

Language and Literacy

Competency 1: Children will engage confidently with others using language in a variety of ways for a variety of purposes and contexts.

Competency 2: Children will describe objects, events and their plans for the day.

Competency  3:    Children     will     enjoy     listening     to    stories                              and poems/rhymes and make up their own stories and rhymes.

Competency 4: Children will enjoy age appropriate books and handle

them carefully.

Competency 5: Children will understand how books are organized. Competency 6: Children will recognise letters and familiar words in simple texts.

Competency 7: Children will use pictures, symbols and familiar letters and words to communicate meaning, show awareness of some (symbols, letters and words), for the different purposes of writing.

 

 

 

Basic Mathematical

Competency 1: Children will develop basic logical, critical, creative and problem-solving skills by demonstrating an understanding of the different attributes of objects, such as colour, size, weight and texture, and match, sequence, sort and classifying objects based on one/two attributes.

Competency 2: Children will develop a basic understanding of quantity, counting up to 50 and simple number operations of 0-9.

Competency 3: Children will recognise basic geometrical shapes and the position of objects in relation to each other and surroundings Competency     4:    Children     will     develop     an    understanding                         of

measurement.

 

Key Learning Areas

Competencies

 

 

 

World Around Us

Competency 1: Children will develop an understanding of how families are important and talk about their family history.

Competency 2: Children will develop an understanding of the people and places around them.

Competency 3: Children will recognise the differences between living and non-living things

Competency 4: Children will recognise the plants and animals in their environment and explore their basic features and habitat.

Competency 5: Children will observe the weather and develop an understanding of the seasons and their significance to people.

Competency 6: Children will develop a caring attitude towards the environment and natural resources

Competency 7: Children will recognise and identify  natural  resources and physical features of Earth.

Competency 8: Children will be able to explore and use basic types of technology

 

 

 

Physical Development

Competency 1: Children will develop a sense of balance, agility and coordination.

Competency 2: Children will have increased hand-eye coordination and the ability to handle tools and materials effectively.

Competency 3: Children will develop sensory motor skills

 

 

 

Health, and Safety

Competency 1: Children will develop an understanding of the importance of healthy, safe and hygienic practices.

Competency 2: Children will develop an understanding of personal safety and security.

 

 

 

Creative Arts

Competency 1: Children will express themselves through the use of drawing and colours.

Competency 2: Children will work with a variety of low cost and waste material to create craft project of their choice.

Competency 3: Children will experiment with a variety of materials to represent their observations and imagination, in the form of models/sculptures.

Competency 4: Children will learn the skills of collage work and printing and use these in a variety of ways to create their own art pieces and patterns developing their fine motor skills.

Competency 5: Children will observe, practice and explore various techniques of folding, cutting, pasting, tearing and  weaving  paper  to make objects and patterns.

Competency 6: Children will listen to, identify and appreciate a variety of sound patterns, rhythms and rhymes as a form of expression.

Competency 7: Children will participate with increasing confidence in a variety of dramatic play activities to express themselves.

 

These competencies will be adapted  to  the  special  needs  of  the children where necessary.