English -Suggested Guidelines (Grade 3)

 

DRAFT

 

SNC - ENGLISH (Grade 3) - Suggested Guidelines

 Competency A: Listening and Speaking Skills

Standard 1: Students will be able to develop competence in listening and spoken language to enhance the effectiveness with which they are able to communicate across a range of contexts and to a range of audiences.

Student Learning Outcomes:  

  • Show awareness of one or more listeners by developing sensitivity to ways that others express meaning in their talk and non-verbal communication.
  • Listen and understand longer conversations from different contexts, short lectures and talks, radio and TV broadcasts, stories, and descriptions of events and will be able identify main ideas. 
  • Talk confidently in extended turns and listen purposefully in a range of contexts
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates.

Knowledge:

Students will:

 

  • Listen and understand to longer conversations from different contexts, short lectures and talks, radio and TV broadcasts, stories, and descriptions of events.
  • Identify main ideas, supporting ideas and contexts while discussing the talks, stories and description of events.
  • Convey ideas about the characters in a drama/play script in different roles and scenarios e.g. story telling, etc.

 

 

 

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

 

Listen and view attentively e.g.,

  1. look at the person speaking and maintain eye contact
  2. maintain appropriate posture and facial expression
  3. listen and view for the entire duration of a conversation
  • Engage in longer conversations, story telling, short group discussions, and respond to ideas and opinions.
  • Demonstrate ‘attentive listening’ and engage appropriately with empathy and respect, taking into account opinions and ideas shared by others while developing their own.
  • Convey ideas about the characters in a drama/play script in different roles and scenarios through deliberate choice of dialogues/speech, gestures, and movements.
  • Engage in simple conversations that require performing everyday tasks and speech acts, such as introducing themselves and others, giving directions, making a call, making requests.
  • Contribute new ideas within a familiar and an unfamiliar group settings to extend meaningful conversation

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

Use various questions to discuss about discussions, in case of a story telling or a drama, following questions can be asked:

  • Which was the most memorable or enjoyable story?
  • How did the storyteller hold your interest?
  • Were the tone of voice, pitch and volume used effectively?
  • Did the storyteller use suitable facial expressions and actions to illustrate the story?
  • How did the storyteller use language to hold your interest?

Summative Assessments

Good listening audios can be used, followed by a written task.

Story telling can be assessed using a checklist (criteria must be shared with students beforehand).

Learning Activities

StoryTelling: (The given activity can be used in a simpler version with students coming up with simple sentences in the beginning of term and taking it to more complex levels in second term.)

Telling a story to entertain an audience involves speaking, listening, having a good memory and performance skills. For this activity, divide class into small groups of 3 or 4. To develop and present a story. Tell students they can base it on a real life event at school or in the community. They can also come up with a fictitious story based on any event. Provide them with a list of new and interesting words along with a prompt they can use to develop their story. (Given below is the prompt. Can be written on board or given as a printed sheet.)

Tell everyone to share their ides until an interesting story is formed.

 

Headings to put structure to the story:

  • Introduction
  • Characters
  • Rising action
  • Ending

Give proper time for practise it with group members and make adjustments. Tell students to experiment with the use of voice by trying he following suggestions:

Pitch-Change the pitch from high to low to change the way characters speak.

Volume-Use a loud voice for emphasis and a soft voice to create tension and suspense.

Pace-Speed up the rate speaking to show excitement and urgency. 

 

Talk about Important Festivals:

Ask students about various festivals they’ve heard of. Talk about Eid, its importance and significance. Ask students about festivals of other cultures, example, Chinese, christians etc. Show them pictures from different cultures and ask them to prepare a five minute talk explaining why it is important for people to celebrate festivals that are part of their culture.

 

 

Guess the Mood:

  • Teacher divides the class into groups. Each group is given a mood word, e.g., happy, sad, scared, angry, surprised. Also give each group a card with a sentence written on. Students take turns to pick a mood card secretly and read the sentence  aloud in the mood written on their mood card. For example, a student may have the mood card ‘happy’ and the sentence,’ We are not going for the picnic this weekend’ in a way conveying the mood on their card.Other group members will try to guess the mood with the expression of the speaker as well as through his/her tone of voice.

 

  • Using mood cards (as above), ask students to use non-verbal communications only to communicate the mood on their card. Can the other group member guess the mood from the facial expressions and posture or other non-verbal gestures that a student uses?

 

 

 

Standard 1Develop/adopt listening attitudes and behaviours to listen to, comprehend, and respond to a variety of speech types. Use appropriate social and academic conventions of spoken discourse for effective oral communication with individuals and in groups, in both formal and informal settings for various purposes.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Give well-structured instructions, descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, and use voice to depict mood, meaning and rhythm.

Engage in simple conversations that require performing everyday tasks and speech acts, such as introducing themselves and others, giving directions, making a call, making requests. 

Knowledge:

Students will:

  • Learn the importance of talking confidently and clearly in extended turns and listen purposefully in a range of contexts
  • Identify and use rhetorical patters and make simple inferences while listening (e.g. following commands, instructions, procedures etc)
  • Take turns to speak on a given topic and during group discussions. 

 

 

 

Skills:

Students will be able to:

 

  • Talk confidently in extended turns and listen purposefully in a range of contexts
  • Apply prior knowledge to discuss important features of a talk, possibly contributing new ideas within a familiar and an unfamiliar group settings 
  • Speak clearly and confidently in a range of contexts including longer speaking turns. 

 

  • Ask questions for clarity and respond to questions from others.

 

  • Demonstrate ‘attentive listening’ and engage appropriately with empathy and respect, taking into account opinions and ideas shared by others while developing their own.

 

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

A class speech or debate competition is organised to develop better listening and speaking skills.

 

Summative Assessments

Listening and speaking assessments help students speak on various topics spontaneously. Provide pictures and topics. Ask students to see them for a few minutes and talk about it for at least 1 minute.

(A pre-designed checklist will be helpful for these assessments.)

Learning Activities

Activity 1

For this activity, teacher needs to divide class into groups of three or four. Teacher provides simple pictures (landscapes depicting different seasons, a fruit basket, etc) and gives it to one group member who needs to describe the group picture in three to four sentences (one sentence per group member) and the rest of the group will have to draw the picture.

 

 

Teacher will see if students have been able to draw it exactly or something close to it. The student explaining it can tell where to draw what (fruit basket next to the jug, a cloud in the sky etc

 

The teacher can give prompts to groups to think how to describe the pictures. For e.g.: What do you see in the picture? How many items are there? What are the colors? What’s happening in the picture?

 

The students gain points on how well their sentences described the picture and were able to guide students in drawing. If the majority of the students are able to replicate the picture, the group presenting will be successful.

 

If the students do not succeed, the teacher can provide feedback to improve their sentences/instructions.

 

Activity 2

Students learn about a few different questions used in different contexts:

Example:

1. How can I help you?

2. Could you please help me?

3. Can you explain a little more?

 

They are given scenarios and  asked to use the appropriate question in each scenario. This activity could happen in pairs for discussion followed by a class discussion to go over answers:

 

For example:

Scenario 1: Your sister is carrying a heavy load. What will you say to her?

Scenario 2: You want some help with a task.

Scenario 3: A friend is trying to say something that is important. But you do not fully understand what he/she is saying. How will you ask them to clarify?

Activity 3

Follow Directions

  • Teacher divides the class into pairs and makes a small maze in class (a small path, with boxes/pencil cases, bag etc). One student from each pair is blindfolded. (Keep in mind safety rules here. If a child is not comfortable being blindfolded; do not force him/her to be).
  • The teacher provides the other partner with an instruction card to cross the maze. Student needs to provide his/her partner with accurate instructions to cross the maze. It is important for teacher to emphasise to the blindfolded student to listen carefully to instructions.
  • The teacher can keep tweaking the maze so that each pair has slightly different directions.

 

 

 

Resources

 

The following link can be used to access poems and nursery rhymes to conduct activities.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/nursery-rhymes-a-to-z-index/z4ddgwx

 

 

 

SNC - ENGLISH (Grade 3) -Suggested Guidelines

  Competency B: Reading and critical thinking skills

Standard 1: Standard 1: Use knowledge, skills, and strategies related to word identification/decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension to construct meaning from informational and literary texts while maintaining a positive disposition towards reading.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Begin to read simple books from a range e.g. story, poetry, information books
  • Use pre-reading strategies to predict some words that might occur in a text by looking at the picture/title (identify the type of text, purpose and intended audience
  • Begin to read with fluency and expression, taking some notice of punctuation, including speech marks
  • Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive reading

 

 

Knowledge:

Students will:

 

  • Use pre-reading strategies to predict about the text

 

  • Analyse the text between various types of books e.g. informative, fictional etc

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

  • Begin to use strategies to learn to blend unfamiliar words to read, including sounding out and separating them into syllables.

 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills of sounds to read single and double syllable words with short and long vowel sounds 

 

  • begin to learn to identify common and complex silent letters in words e.g. chalk, guess, guest, knife, knowledge etc

 

  • Demonstrate an understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes) and associate sounds with common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels

 

  •  Use pre-reading strategies to predict some words that might occur in a text by looking at the picture/title (identify the type of text, purpose and intended audience) (add analysis)

 

  • Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate (application of strategies)rate, and expression on successive reading analyse the text and apply strategies

 

 

 

 

Assessments

Formative Assessments:

Share a new book with students encouraging them to individually read through it, find new and unfamiliar words, pronounce it share the information/story presented in the book. 

 

Summative Assessments:

 

Provide students with a set of similar comprehension passage as used in the book; ask them to read aloud, and attempt the questions given at the end.

 

  

Learning Activities:

 

Activity 1:

Teacher carefully selects a book with number of short stories or two to three short stories by same author. Read aloud these books. (Teacher needs to ensure that each story is not more than 2 minutes long.) As he/she reads; engage the students in a  talk by asking their opinion by the book. Following questions can be helpful.

 

  • What did you like/did not like in the story?
  • Were you able to picture anything about the story in your mind? What kind of a picture comes to your mind? Explain in simple sentences.
  • Was there any word or phrase that caught your attention? Why did you like it?

 

Later, a few students can be asked to read a short story aloud.

 

 

 

Activity 2:

 

Divide students in pairs and provide them with a number and a variety of books (fiction/non fiction). Encourage the students to go through the title, front and back cover of the book and predict:

 

  • Is your book fiction or non-fiction? How do you know?
  • What is your book about? How do you know? (Encourage learners to use the title, the covers pictures, the blurb as well as a brief skim through.)

 

  • Which features usually found in non-fiction books can you find in your book? (e.g. contents, index, glossary, photographs, illustrations, diagrams, maps, charts, headings and subheadings, captions and labels, bullet points, different fonts for different ways of presenting information)

 

Check that all of the learners can identify the features. Discuss the purpose of each of the features. Focus particularly on the different purposes and organisation of the contents and index pages.

 

 

 

Standard 1: Use knowledge, skills, and strategies related to word identification/decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension to construct meaning from informational and literary texts, while maintaining a positive disposition towards reading.

Student Learning Outcomes: Phonics:  

  • Use strategies to learn to blend unfamiliar words to read, including sounding out and separating them into syllables. 
  • Demonstrate an understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes) and associate sounds with common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.

Knowledge:

Students will:

 

  • Apply grade-level phonics to decode words.

 

  •  Use initial consonant digraphs and consonant blends (e.g., sw, sk,  bl, br, cl, cr, dr, fl, gl, pl, pr, sl, sm, sp, tr, tw, wh, qu) to:
  • Read, pronounce and spell new words effectively

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

Apply grade-level phonics in decoding words.

  • Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled two and three-syllable words.
  •  Decode regularly spelled two or three-syllable words.
  •  Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.
  •  Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes. (e.g. re-,-less,-ful)
  •  Use knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a printed word (put a hand under the chin, to see where the chin drops at the vowel while speaking the word, number of chin drops is also the number of syllables).

 Recognise and apply grade-level word analysis skills to:

  •  Read common high-frequency words by sight (grade-level)
  •  Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.
  •  Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words 
  •  Recognize and  match contractions to words (e.g., couldn’t – could not)
  •  Recognize silent letters

 

Identify and apply grade-level phonics skills to read:

Match sounds to their corresponding letters/ letter patterns:

 ° i° long vowel sounds A (ai, ay, a-e); E (ee,ea); U (u-e,ue); I (ie, igh, i-e),O (oo)

  ° vowel digraphs (e.g., oo, ee, ea, oa,  ai, ay) 

 ° final y as a vowel

 ° consonant digraphs in initial position (e.g., th, sh, ch, wh, ph)

 ° initial consonant blends (e.g., sw, sn, sk,  bl, br, ch, cl, cr, dr, fl, gl, ph, pl, pr, sh, sl, sm, sp, st, th, tr, tw, wh, qu)

 ° final consonant blends (e.g., nd, nk, nt, mp)

 ° double consonants (e.g., tt, pp, rr, gg, nn, ss, ll, ck)

 ° diphthongs (e.g., ou, ow)

 ° inflectional suffix (e.g., -s, -es, -ing, -ed)

 ° syllables (common patterns, e.g., vowel-consonant, consonant-vowel, consonant-vowel-consonant)

°silent letters, e.g., – e (e.g., cake, kite, home)– b (e.g., comb, plumb, thumb, climb, plumber, limb)

°Recognise and articulate soft and hard sounds of the letters c and g

 

 

 

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments:

Develop worksheets for vowel sounds(short and long), consonant blends, generate strings with rhymes and breaking them down into vowel-consonant, consonant-vowel-consonant, using visual strings like letter patterns analogy to work out the likely spelling, trying out different possible spellings before deciding which ‘looks right and using a dictionary.

 

Summative Assessments:

Word puzzles, spelling competitions, dictations, using words in a context or in their writings etc.

Learning Activities:

Teaching an unfamiliar word:

 

While reading a text aloud, cover up a potentially unfamiliar word. Ask students to use pictures as cues to develop the sense and syntax of the sentence (re-reading the whole sentence, without the missing word, and trying to predict the word class, then the likely meaning of the word).

 

Uncover the word, bit by bit. Focus on common letter patterns or syllables, depending on the reading skills of the students.

  • Use five-minute sessions, ask students  what they can say about it. Encourage observations which include reference to:
  • any recognised long or short vowel phonemes and the possible pronunciations (ask learners to make links to other words when they explain the possible pronunciations, e.g. ea could be ‘ee’ as in bead or ‘e’ as in bread)
  • any recognised syllables and possible pronunciations (with analogous words)
  • prefixes or suffixes that are recognised
  • possible pronunciations of the word

Develop a word learning programme for students to spell and read the words they need to use confidently and accurately by the end of the year. Some suggestions are:

  • Make a word wall of phonically regular high frequency words 
  • ing, -ed and –s forms of regular verbs
  • common irregular verbs
  • Carry out regular dictation activities to enable students to apply word skills effectively.

 

 

 

 

 

Standard 2: Use a variety of reading strategies appropriate to the reading purpose, meaning and type of text to comprehend and analyse a range of literary (prose, poetry and drama) and informational texts (expository, persuasive, procedural, and functional texts).

Student Learning Outcomes: Reading Fluency:  Read grade-level text with sufficient accuracy, fluency, comprehension, and appropriate expression.

Knowledge:

Students will:

 

Develop reading skills by reading age-appropriate text with sufficient accuracy, fluency and expression

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

Read aloud with sufficient accuracy and fluency to:

  1. Support comprehension.

 

  1. literary and informational/functional short connected texts with purpose and understanding. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary

 

  1. Apply punctuation rules to assist in developing accuracy and fluency through reading aloud. 

Assessments

Formative Assessments

 

3 minute reading assessments can be extensively use for reading efficacy. (The process to conduct these assessments can be found on https://microsite-sws-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/media/editor/32/Scholastic_3-Minute_Reading_Assessment_-_Grades_1-4.pdf)

 

 

Summative Assessment:

Lexile reading programme can be used for summative assessments. (Sample passages based on the lexile reading programme can be used without computer/internet) Further information can be accessed from:

 

https://lexile.com

Learning Activities:

How to teach reading fluently (fluency strategies)

  • Help students focus on making connections among ideas within the text and their own background knowledge. This helps increase comprehension.
  • When struggling with words, help them decode them. Sound the words out syllable by syllable, gently correcting them when they make a mistake. 
  • Make students learn how to divide the text into small chunks. By focusing on one clause at a time, they will be able to do so easily. Add expression to their reading. Help them understand when to pause, and when to emphasise certain words or phrases. 
  • Understand that fluency is not static. Children will read more fluently when the subject is familiar to them. Even experienced readers will read more slowly when reading about a new subject. 
  • Model fluent reading. Help them determine appropriate times to pause, emphasise, and add emotion to their reading. 
  • Encourage students to re-read passages multiple times. Model fluent reading of the same passage for them.
  • One-on-one reading: Reading out loud with an adult who can help provide a model of fluent reading and help with word recognition and comprehension
  • Group Reading: Have students read out loud simultaneously in a group
  • Recorded reading: Students read aloud along with a recording.
  • Partner Reading: Students can pair up and take turns reading out loud to each other
  • Popcorn Reading:
  •  Encourage students to take turns reading two to three sentences at a time. Once one finishes, another student volunteers to read the next few sentences. This goes on until everybody has read.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNC - ENGLISH (Grades 3) - Suggested Guidelines

  DOMAIN C: Vocabulary and Grammar

Standard 1: Use vocabulary accurately and appropriately as well as understand how speakers/writers put words together and use vocabulary to communicate meaning and achieve impact.

Student Learning Outcomes

Recognise and use grade-level words that show feelings and emotions, recognise and generate rhyming strings in writing and make anagrams from simple one/two-syllable words in class.

Knowledge:

Students will know to:

  • Learn to use emotive words appropriately e.g. happy, happier, sad, anxious , etc.
  • Understand to form anagrams and generate rhyming string

Skills:

Students will be able to…

Recognise and classify words into different categories and use:

  • Expression words
  • Make anagrams from simple one/two syllable words
  • Generate rhyming words e.g. bridge/fridge, win/bin etc

 

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

Various word building strategies can be used here. Some of the strategies that can be used are:

 

  • Cross-word puzzle exercises (worksheets)
  • Identifying anagrams and rhyming words within a poem etc
  • Anagram riddles (see appendix for sample activity sheet)

 

Another interesting activity can be:

Give students anagrams of colour words. Ask them to unscramble the letters to find the colours. For example:

Sliver-silver

Lebu-blue

 

Summative Assessment

An extract of a text can be provided to students asking them to identify rhyming words, anagrams and emotive and expressive words and write them separately in their notebooks or worksheet. (Sample text attached in appendix)

Learning Activities

Various word building exercises can be used to develop and enhance vocabulary.

 

Activity 1: (Anagrams)

Introduce the term ‘Anagram’ to students. Write one syllable word on the board in the boxes and give numbering to each letter e.g.

 

1           2.           3.          4.          5.  

E           A           R           T          H

 

Encourage students to rearrange the letters to form a new one. e.g. heart

 

Provide a list of words to students. Ask them to rearrange words to form new words.

 

Activity 2: (Rhyming words)

 

Recap with students some simple rhyming words that they have learnt and use in previous classes.

 

Activity 2: (Expressive language )

 

 

 

Activity 3: (Rhyming words)

 

 This activity is just to enhance vocabulary and revisiting previous concepts on rhyming words

 

Follow the discussion with a read-aloud rhyming book. Read the book twice, the second time asking children to identify the rhyming words on each page. Write the rhyming words onto index cards and group them together on the floor or in a pocket chart.

 Invite the class to assemble the rhyming word cards in a designated area of the classroom where they can make a rhyming word wall. Review the sets of rhyming words with the class. Invite them to think of other words that rhyme and add those to the rhyming word wall.

 

  DOMAIN C: Vocabulary and Grammar

Standard  2:  Understand and use punctuation, syntax, grammatical functions, rules and applications for developing accuracy and meaning in their spoken and written communication.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Understand and use different types of nouns i.e. common, proper (e.g. Pakistan, Ali), countable (e.g cup, pen), uncountable nouns (e.g. sugar, salt) and change the regular nouns into irregular nouns (e.g. child-children, thief-thieves)
  • Classify and write spellings of days of the week, month and numbers. 
  • Take dictation of familiar words studied in class.
  • Learn strategies to keep a record of words (e.g., word wall, word bank).
  • Recognise the function of joining words in sentences.
  • Use simple connectors i.e. for addition (e.g., and, as well as) for reason (e.g., because) for sequence (e.g., first, second).
  • Recognise and apply capitalisation to the initial letter of proper nouns and for letters beginning the first word of a sentence. Use capital letters for beginning the first word of a sentence for the word

 

 

Knowledge:

 

Students will:

 

  • Classify countable and uncountable nouns
  • Identify and learn the use of  articles effectively i.e.’a,’an' and 'the'.       
  • Recognise words as doing verbs.
  • Identify describing words as adjectives.
  • Use the degrees of adjectives in sentences with ‘more’ and ‘most’
  • Learn the use of connectives e.g., but/because

Skills:

Students will be able to

  1. Sort words into different categories from reading materials and use simple action, naming and describing words from pictures and immediate surrounding
  2. Classify the different types of nouns i.e Common, Proper (e.g Pakistan, Ali) , countable (e.g Cup, pen) ,uncountable nouns(e.g Sugar, salt) and change the regular nouns into irregular nouns.(e.g child-children, (thief-thieves)
  3. Differentiate between countable and uncountable nouns and learn to use of quantifiers with countable and uncountable nouns( some, few/little, many/much
  4. Differentiate and use subjective, objective and possessive pronouns in sentences.
  5. Use interrogative pronouns to make question sentences.
  6. Use adjectives of quantity, quality, size, shape and colour and use them in sentences before nouns and after verbs.(e.g The food is delicious. /The delicious food is served.)
  7. Use connectives of reason in their sentences
  8. Apply punctuation appropriately in their sentences

 

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

Subject and Object Pronouns:

  1. Provide students a set of sentences and ask them to identify the subject, verb, direct object and indirect object circling, underlying or highlighting them in different ways.
  2.  
  3. Connectives:

Give students sentence starters and ask them to complete the sentences by adding a phrase starting the connective ‘but’ or ‘because’.

 

Summative Assessments

Subject and Object Pronouns:        

  1. Provide a worksheet with a set of sentences to assess understanding of the use of subject and object pronouns. Ask students to rewrite the 

sentences and to replace the corresponding parts with subject or object pronouns.

  1.  

 

  1. Connectives:

 

Provide students with a simple paragraph without connectives. Ask them to add the correct connective and punctuation mark in their work.

Learning Activities

 

1) This writing activity aims to help students identify nouns, verbs and pronouns. It further reinforces subject and object pronouns by asking students to categorise the pronouns that have been identified.

In their notebooks, students should sort out the words in a table into four sets:

Nouns              Verbs           Subject pronoun             Object pronoun

 

Divide students in two groups:

Subject and

Direct object

 

Use sentences that include one or two nouns. They can include proper nouns e.g.

  1. Ahmed kicked the ball.
  2. Fatima ate the pizza.
  3. The salad has lettuce, cucumber and tomatoes.

 

Ask each group to clap when they hear their part of the sentences, namely the subject and the direct object.

 

2) Use of Adjectives: (The following activity can be used as a starter activity for eliciting prior knowledge on adjectives)

Begin the lesson by playing a game to get the students to think about adjectives. A list of adjectives can be put up on board for students to refer to.

Throw the ball to a student asking him to say an adjective and take few seconds and use it in a sentences. He, then throws the ball to another student. Continue the game till all students get a chance to call out an adjective and use it in a sentence properly.

 

 

2b) Use common adjectives and comparative and superlative adjectives to give personal information and opinions)

 

Write the days of the week and months of the year on separate pieces of paper. Place them face down on the table. Ask a student to pick up one card and then describe a memory or an event that happened in that particular month. Use the list of adjectives to describe memory or event. Continue doing this until all students have taken their turns.

3) Connectives of reason:

Introduce the term ‘connectives’. Explain students that connectives are used to join together parts of sentences. Prepare the following sentences on paper strips. Give parts of strips to different students asking them to hold them properly. One student should be provided with the word ‘but’ and another with the symbol ‘, comma’

  • I like asking questions. Sometimes I don’t know what to ask.
  • I think we followed the instructions. Something does not seem right.
  • I love experiments.Sometimes they take too long to carry out.

Ask the students to read both parts of the sentences. Then ask the student with a comma to stand with the student holding the 1st part of the sentence and the one holding ‘but’ right after. The sentence should be like, ‘I like asking questions, but sometimes I don’t know what to ask’. Rewrite the sentence on the board using correct punctuation.

  DOMAIN C: Vocabulary and Grammar

Standard 2:  Understand and use punctuation, syntax, grammatical functions, rules and applications for developing accuracy and meaning in their spoken and written communication.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Use simple present verbs to show habitual actions, universal statements, and current facts in sentences and paragraphs
  • Use past simple for completed actions/events and regular actions in the past.(In paragraphs)
  • Use of future tense will/shall/be going to (e.g., I will go to the library tomorrow/My parents are going to attend the concert.)
  • Identify and use simple adverbs of manner and time.
  • Recognise and use regular and irregular degrees of adverbs, use more and most with adverbs.
  • Understand and use simple  modal verbs (should/should not, could / couldn’t, must / mustn’t) can /cannot and, may/may not.

 

 

Knowledge:

Students will:

 

  • Learn verbs in simple present, past and future in speech and writing
  • Understand regular and irregular degrees of adverbs and adverbs of manner and time.

 

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

  • Use action verbs in speech and writing.
  • Identify and make simple sentences with the verbs be, done, do, and have as main verbs.
  • Demonstrate the use of verb can/cannot , may may not
  • Use and differentiate between regular and irregular verbs i.e buy-bought, go -went.
  • Distinguish verbs according to meaning: for example, mental verbs (think) and feeling verbs (love, hate)
  • Use of simple present for schedule future actions/even
  • Identify and use simple sentences that show instructions, commands and  requests, surprise.
  • Understand to make questions by using Wh-questions (e.g What are you doing?)
  • Understand to make  simple questions starting with verbs (e.g.  Are you going to Lahore today?)
  • Recognise that sentences comprise of Subject + Predicate   
  • Make simple sentences by using SV (subject and verb) and SVO (subject, verb, object) pattern e.g Alia Cooks food.

Assessments

 Formative Assessments

1)Action verbs:

Worksheets on action verbs can be designed along with written work in the notebooks.

 

2) Adverbs of Sequence:

Students can write instructions about making an egg or making a milkshake in sequence.

 

3) Adverbs of Frequency:

Design worksheets with fill in the blanks where students are required to add in correct adverbs. Alternatively, provide with a paragraph asking students to identify adverbs of sequence and frequency both.

 

Summative Assessments

  • Class Tests
  • Oral Quiz
  • Identify for grammar and vocabulary in students writings.

 

Learning Activities:

1) Action Verbs

Step 1: To begin, elicit some common action verbs from students. To do this, act out some actions and ask them to guess what it is.For example, pick up a book and pretend to read. Students will likely guess the action verb ‘read’. Do the same with other verbs such as write, eat, run, etc, and write them on the board.

Step 2 : In front of each verb, write‘I’ and practice saying each of these verbs together with ‘I’. For example, “I read. I write. I eat. I run.”, etc.

  • Write‘I wake up’ on the board and then ask students what time they wake up. Then complete the sentence on the board to make the present simple sentence. For example ‘I wake up at 8.’

Do the same for other daily actions / routines and write these examples on the board.

  • I wake up at 7.
  • I eat breakfast at 8.
  • I go to school at 8:30.
  • I study English at 10.
  • I have lunch at 12.
  • I go home at 3.
  • I do my homework at 5.
  • I cook dinner at 7.
  • I go to bed at 11.

Step 3:  Demonstrate the students to ask  “What time do you get up?” and that student will answer something like “I wake up at 7 o’clock.”Then point at that student and say, “You wake up at 7 o’clock.” Next, ask the student again “What time do you get up?” then when he/she answers, encourage the rest of the class to point at the student and say, “You get up at 7 o’clock.”

Step 4: Ask a student again “What time do you get up?” and he/she will answer “I get up at 7 o’clock.” Repeat the sentence saying the student’s name e.g.,“Faiza gets up at 7 o’clock.”

Do the same with a few students to demonstrate these present simple sentences in the third person singular form. Then ask students to identify how the verb changed in those sentences.

Also explain to students that when using the plural form, the verb does not change.

Step 5: Negative sentences: give students a few minutes to ask their partner about food / activities that they like or don’t like. Then go around the class and ask students to tell you about what their partner likes or doesn’t like.

For example, a student might say,“Fahad likes paratha. He does not like rice.

2) Sequential Adverbs:

Introduce the term adverb of sequence to students. Establish a Link with the previous action verbs activity explaining how things are done in a sequence. Sequential adverbs help us to describe what to do when we need to do things in an order. Also, explain that the words, ‘sequence’ and order are synonym of each other.

Start the activity by asking students if they have ever given or seen anyone giving directions to someone. How do they give directions? Based on students response, explain how directions or instructions are given in a sequence. For example, while giving road directions, we use certain words like, first, then, next’ and ‘lastly’. Write these words on the board telling them that these are sequential adverbs. These words tell us when to do something-they help to get things right in many situations.

Ask students to use these words and give directions on reaching the cricket ground from any particular place. An example is given below

First cross road.

Then go straight until you reach Kalma Chowk.

Next turn left.

Go straight until you see the traffic lights and then turn right.

At the end of the road turn left and it’s on your left.

 

3) Adverbs of Frequency: (never, sometimes, rarely, usually, always)

Continue playing with adverbs and introduce the term adverbs of frequency Explain that these are used to talk about how often we do something. Display a list of adverbs of frequency on the board. Elicit students’ prior knowledge on how often do they eat oranges. Encourage them to give answers from the list.

 

Write a few sentences on the board. For example,

I always go to Masjid to offer my prayers

I never eat sugarcane juice.

Sometimes I enjoy going to a museum.

We rarely go to the seaside.

Underline adverbs of frequency.

 

Students then write simple instructions on making an egg.

 

 

 

 

SNC - ENGLISH (Grade 3) - Suggested Guidelines

  Competency D: Writing

Standard 1: Write English legibly, fluently and with correct grammar, punctuation and spelling, for a variety of purposes.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Learn to spell simple high-frequency words and common irregular words. 
  • Begin to use strategies for segmenting unfamiliar words to spell, e.g. breaking into individual sounds, separating into syllables
  • Spell and write familiar, and unfamiliar words accurately.
  • Build up handwriting speed, fluency and develop an understanding of capital letters, full stops and question marks within a sentence.

Knowledge:

Students will:

 

  • Write words and sentences in a legible and consistent handwriting
  • Formulate appropriate paragraph indentation, word spacing and spacing of text on a page.
  • Spell and write unfamiliar words

Skills:

Students will be able to…

  1. Write letters, words and sentences legibly and consistently on three/four-lined paper through practice.
  2. Use appropriate paragraph indentation, word spacing, and spacing of text on a page to enhance readability.
  3. Write multi-syllable words at grade level with correct spelling, using spelling rules and strategies: noting sound and visual patterns in words, applying vowel-consonant patterns (e.g., blends, doubling of consonants, changing the ending of a word from –y to –ies when forming the plural), making analogies from familiar words,
  4. Apply grade-level word analysis skills to:
    1. Spell common high-frequency words by sight (grade-level)
    2. Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.
    3. Spell grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words
    4. Spell contractions to words (e.g., couldn’t – could not)
    5. Spell words with common prefixes and suffixes. (e.g. re-,-less,-ful)
  5. Spell and write accurately using knowledge of phonic elements, words with:
    1. short and long vowel sounds:  a, e, i, o, u
    2. vowel digraphs (e.g., oo, ee, ea, oa,  ai, ay)
    3. word families with vowel-consonant patterns (e.g., -at, -an, -ad, -ap, -et, -en, -ill, -ig, -in, -ot, -op, -og, -ug, -un)
    4. final y as a vowel
    5. consonant digraphs in initial position (e.g., th, sh, ch, wh)
    6. initial consonant blends (e.g., sw, sn, sk,  bl, br, ch, cl, cr, dr, fl, gl, ph, pl, pr, sh, sl, sm, sp, st, th, tr, tw, wh, qu)
    7. final consonant blends (e.g., nd, nk, nt, mp)
    8. double consonants (e.g., tt, pp, rr, gg, nn, ss, ll, ck)
    9. diphthongs (e.g., ou, ow)
    10. inflectional suffix (e.g., -s, -es, -ing, -ed)
    11. silent letters, e.g., – e (e.g., cake, kite, home)– b (e.g., comb, plumb, thumb, climb, plumber, limb)
    12. soft and hard sounds of the letters c and g

 

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

  • Check for Understandings

Sample: The teacher may write a word incorrectly on the board and ask a show of thumbs up if it is written correctly.

  • Blending activities:
  • Ask students to break down each sound in a word to spell if they struggle to spell correctly to check where they struggle (identification of sound-letter, blending, etc.)

 

Summative Assessments

  • Term Tests, Quizzes, Exams
  • Dictation may be part of regular testing
  • Spelling to be an indicator in writing assessment rubrics.

Learning Activities

  • Introduce high frequency words. (List shared in appendix.) Provide students with a copy or alternatively they can write these in a notebook and learn them.

 

  • Teach and reinforce the recognition and spelling of high frequency words regularly. This could include:
  • pointing out high frequency words when reading
  • pointing out common word endings such as -s, -ed, -ing 
  • Use them in writing activities and oral sentence construction
  • Reinforce them in handwriting activities.

 

  • Do ‘quick-write’ activities: Ask students to write a given word as a handwriting activity on one day, then ask them to reproduce it several times on the next day. Reinforce at the end of a week.
  • LASACAWAC (look and say and cover and write and check) is an effective strategy to teach words. Ask students to look at a word for a few minutes and try to memorise it. After a few minutes, cover the word and write it and then check to ensure about your spelling. Repeat the process until the student memorises the word.
  • Come up with a word wall. Tell students to read through the words everyday. Add in words each week. This will help in developing better vocabulary and spelling.
  • Encourage students to use new words in their writings with accurate spelling. Also, ask them to use them in their conversations.

 

 

Standard 2: Apply skills and strategies for idea generation, selection, development, organization and revision for a variety of writing purposes and text types.

Student Learning Outcomes Use pre-writing strategies to compose sentences.

Knowledge:

 

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

  1. Follow the steps of the process approach to plan for writing a paragraph: brainstorm, mind mapping, using a variety of graphic organizers.

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

During whole class activities to fill graphic organizers, the teacher asks individual students to contribute their ideas.

Ask a student specific questions to generate ideas (What would happen if? What does it look like? What other tings can you think of?)

 

Summative Assessments

Exams, Quizzes, Tests

Fill a graphic organizer individually to generate ideas.

 

Learning Activities

 The teacher fills in a graphic organizer with the whole class on the board. Then children fill one themselves in a groups or pairs. They then  

 practise filling one individually. This will help them generate ideas on different topics.

 

Standard 2: Apply skills and strategies for idea generation, selection, development, organization and revision for a variety of writing purposes and text types.

Student Learning Outcomes

 

  • Write a simple paragraph to express ideas on a variety of genres.
  • Write a process/procedure paragraph in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, use linking words (first, second, etc.), and provide a concluding statement or section.
  • Build up handwriting speed, fluency and develop an understanding of capital letters, full stops and question marks within a sentence
  • Spell and write familiar, and unfamiliar words accurately.
  • Write multi-syllable words to express the tone of the characters in a setting according to the title.

Knowledge:

Students will be able to…

 

  • Recognise that a simple paragraph comprises a group of sentences that is developed around a single main idea.

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

  1. Compose a simple paragraph on the given text types, using correct punctuation and spelling, by using the process approach  brainstorm, mind mapping, writing a first draft.
  2. Identify the main idea in a simple paragraph.
  3. Write a few simple sentences to describe/show sequence in a picture/series of pictures.
  4. Write simple descriptive paragraphs (giving general description of a person/object)

Assessments

 

Formative Assessments

Checklists for understanding (Provides a clear understanding whether the student has met the criteria or not)

Peer review

Summative Assessments

 End of unit assessment, class and term tests, Exams

Learning Activities

Brainstorm the ideas of writing a paragraph. Explain students that writing needs to be for a purpose. Discuss the writing process. Explain that since it is only one paragraph, keep descriptions specific. Remind them to use adverbs, sequential and frequent adverbs to make their writing interesting.

Develop the first draft with students on the board, write students ideas, words, sentences in the sequence they use. Then edit the draft using a different coloured marker/chalk, omitting the unnecessary words, adding in details, replacing words with synonyms, checking the punctuation.

The process of drafting helps students develop better writing skills.

Students work on their paragraphs independently.

 

Standard 2: Apply skills and strategies for idea generation, selection, development, organization and revision for a variety of writing purposes and text types.

Student Learning Outcomes Review and revise written work.

Knowledge:

 

 

 

Skills:

Students will be able to…

  1. Review & Revise written work (using a simple editing checklist) for spelling, grammar, punctuation (capital letters, full stops, question marks, exclamation marks, commas)

 

Assessments

 Formative Assessments

Students to do a self-check using a writing checklist at the end of their work. The teacher can observe and double-check if they are identifying errors correctly.

The teacher may model filling a checklist and take responses from the students.

 Summative Assessments

Students to be marked on whether they have used a checklist to review their work and edit it after review. Marks to be given on the use of this checklist, and whether the use was correct or not.

 

Learning Activities

 After brainstorming and writing a first draft, students to use a simple writing checklist to review their work.

Write a second draft after review.